Day: September 14, 2019

Test Of Emergency Alert System ScheduledTest Of Emergency Alert System Scheduled

first_imgResidents may see several notices from the test on that day, all of which will indicate that the transmission is a test message. Local broadcasters, such as KSRM, will air EAS messages similar to regularly scheduled tests, which include an audible message that is expected to last about one minute and can be seen or heard on local television and radio stations. The KPB Alerts system is a local warning system administered by the Kenai Peninsula Borough and is not being tested with the EAS and WEA system. To receive alerts on your wireless phone, a one-time registration is required. All residents of the Borough are encouraged to register for alerts and to visit http://alerts.kpb.us for more information.center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A national test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system will be conducted, on September 20, beginning at 10:18am.  In addition to the tests aired on broadcasters, the WEA system will be tested for the first time at a national level. This system can send urgent messages to cell phones by broadcasting from active cell towers, and will appear as a notification on cellular phones.last_img read more

RIP Mygazines 20082008RIP Mygazines 20082008

first_imgWe thank you for your patronage. If you are a publisher interested in understanding more about our model and vision for the future of the publishing industry going forward, or to discuss our Business to Business model opportunities, please email us at mygazines@gmail.com. Sincerely,The Mygazines Team It’s over:Dear valued members, visitors and publishers, Due to monetary reasons and the state of the global economy, we unfortunately must close mygazines.com. We simply ran out of funds to support the daily operations. last_img

Publisher CoOp Offers its Own Stimulus PlanPublisher CoOp Offers its Own Stimulus Plan

first_imgThe Integrated Media Cooperative has announced a “Publisher Stimulus Program” that lets new members join the co-op with a $1,000 down payment and an earn-out on the first $4,000 in rebates. The announcement comes as two new publishers—Vendome Group and Questex Media—join the co-operative. “We have been talking with the IMC for some time and the new stimulus program makes this a no brainer,’ said Questex CEO Kerry Gumas in a statement. “We look forward to significant savings in the areas of telemarketing and paper purchasing among the other areas where the IMC has partners. Founded in 2005, the Integrated Media Cooperative lets members pool best practives and volume purchasing and includes members such as Crain Communications, Edgell Publishing, Farm Journal Media and Vance Publishing.last_img read more

Celebrity Fashion Magazines Collect Dust on NewsstandsCelebrity Fashion Magazines Collect Dust on Newsstands

first_imgIn Touch Weekly745,123905,092-17.7 U.S. News40,30431,640-35.1 Kiplinger’s30,73144,407-30.8 SmartMoney31,88649,133-35.1 Cosmopolitan1,616,908 1,753,732-7.8 Fast Company24,65930,085-18.0 BusinessWeek27,95329,917-6.6 People1,319,350 1,512,476-12.8 Star601,115701,318-14.3 W27,58334,917-21.0 Marie Claire263,444289,668-9.1 Harper’s Bazaar145,445167,291-13.1 In Style625,589783,254-20.1 Entertainment Weekly40,49440,1470.9 Money67,275101,770-33.9 Glamour589,665685,633-14.0 Life & Style478,788519,388-7.8 Fortune25,40935,789-29.0 Harvard Business Review27,25332,326-15.7 OK!398,360500,520-20.4center_img Newsweek64,86682,756-21.6 Vogue374,750385,500-2.8 Time100,38295,9504.6 Forbes27,17232,096-15.3 NEWSWEEKLIES20092008% CHNG FASHION20092008% CHNG BUSINESS/FINANCE20092008% CHNG Inc.26,00021,7756.9 Celebrity magazines didn’t fare much better on the newsstand. OK! magazine—which announced today that it is reducing its rate base to 800,000 from 900,000—saw newsstand sales fall 20.4 percent to 398,360 copies. Time Inc.’s Entertainment Weekly posted the only newsstand growth with single copy sales climbing a modest 0.9 percent. Overall circ., however, dropped 1.9 percent to 1,779,537.Although they don’t rely heavily on newsstand sales, the newsweekly and business/finance categories also saw their share of single copy losses. Money magazine, which actually sells a significant number of copies on the newsstand, saw single copy sales drop 33.9 percent to 67,275 (down from 101,770). Among the decliners in both categories, only BusinessWeek, The Economist and Inc. didn’t post double-digit declines.Among the gainers, The Week saw single copies skyrocket 131.3 percent, but up only to 4,209 copies from 1,820. U.S. News & World Report (although no longer technically a newsweekly) saw a 27.4 percent spike in newsstand sales while its overall circulation dropped 25.3 percent to 1,365,652 copies.Here’s a look at single copy sales, category-by-category, through the first six months (per ABC): Elle291,577332,167-12.2 The Economist62,49166,888-6.6 Lucky198,583237,750-16.5 Entrepreneur38,69242,981-10.0 The Audit Bureau of Circulations today released its long-awaited FAS-FAX report for the first half of 2009. Not surprisingly, preliminary numbers showed that, of the more than 500 magazines reporting, overall paid subscriptions were flat, up about half a percentage point.Single copy sales, meanwhile, were down 12 percent overall compared to the same six-month period last year. Notably, our beloved newsstand behemoths—celebrity and fashion titles—saw some of the biggest single copy declines. In the fashion category, Condé Nast’s W registered the biggest newsstand loss of the period, with single copy sales nosediving 21 percent (from 34,917 copies to 27,583). Time Inc.’s In Style followed closely with newsstand sales dropping 20.1 percent to 625,589. Condé Nast’s Vogue, the category’s newsstand powerhouse, saw single copy sales drop 7.8 percent to 1,616,908 copies. Allure190,333228,667-16.8 CELEBRITY20092008% CHNG Us Weekly843,479869,364-3.0 The Week4,2091,820131.3last_img read more

People on the MovePeople on the Move

first_img LinkedIn has hired three editors to bolster its content production team. Caroline Fairchild will be a San Francisco-based new economy editor, Ramya Venugopal will be a senior editor based in India, and Maya Pope-Chappell will cover education and millenials based in New York. “In a way, joining Yahoo is a return to my digital-first roots,” he wrote on his personal Tumblr page. “I started going to Yahoo Finance for market news and data years ago while writing my daily blog, ‘Streetlife,’ which launched in September 1997 at Fortune.com…for all of Yahoo Finance’s scale and success, I see a tremendous opportunity to elevate it further. I look forward to exploring all the possibilities that the digital realm has to offer and to pushing out to other forms such as live events. The elevation process also entails expanding the creation of original premium content. This means bringing in distinguished reporters and journalists to break news and do groundbreaking and award-winning stories both in text and video and on mobile.” Marie Claire appointed Dawn Reese as Los Angeles director. Reese had been luxury director of sales for Glamour. Philip Michaels has been hired by Purch to be senior editor of Tom’s Guide and LaptopMag.com. Michaels had been the editor-in-chief of TechHive and executive editor of MacWorld.com. Here’s the rest of this week’s people on the move: Vulture, New York’s entertainment news vertical, has hired three writers. Gazelle Emami has been brought as senior editor, while Lauretta Charlton and Dee Lockett join as associate editors. Jay Gallagher was named publisher of Men’s Journal. Gallagher had been associate publisher of the magazine since 2013. Andy Serwer is the tech giant’s latest hire, coming over as editor-in-chief of Yahoo Finance. Serwer had been editor of Fortune for eight years until leaving the post last year. Yahoo continues to go after editors with magazine experience to lead up its digital content verticals. Penske Media named Paul Jowdy senior vice president and group publisher of WWD. Jowdy had been vice president and publisher of WWD. Kelsey Keith was named editor-in-chief of Vox Media’s Curbed. Keith had been special projects editor for Dwell.last_img read more

Imagination Award Winners Revealed at IMAG ConferenceImagination Award Winners Revealed at IMAG Conference

first_img Revenue: Atlantic Re:think & Netflix House of Cards’ “The Ascent” – The Atlantic A panel of 25 judges from various “independent” magazine companies—essentially, those titles not published by Hearst, Condé Nast, Time Inc., and the like—refined more than 100 entries for the inaugural awards down to winners across six categories, plus a special, “Why Didn’t I Think of That?” award. See the full list of winners below: “Counter to the meganormous companies who are trying to appeal to the largest audience possible, tonight’s awards demonstrate that you don’t have to be everything to everyone in order to be successful—and that’s a wonderful accomplishment to celebrate,” said Seymour. Why Didn’t I Think of That?: The Factory – Surfing Magazine Audience: Leveraging Online Engagement – Roadkill Magazine Lesley Jane Seymour, quipping about her own newfound independence, served as emcee. The winners of the inaugural Imagination Awards, recognizing the best work produced by independent magazine media brands, were revealed by the Association of Magazine Media (MPA) in San Francisco last night as part of the IMAG 2016 proceedings. Leadership: Catapult Creative Labs – Active Interest Media Digital: PORTER Shoppability: Enabling Real-Time Purchases Through Content – PORTER Magazine Content: National Park Service Centennial – Backpacker Projects completed between January 1 and December 31, 2015 were considered, but digital-only brands were not. MPA membership was not a requirement.  Active Interest Media took home a pair of awards: in the Content category for Backpacker’s National Park Service Centennial, and in the Leadership category for its content marketing unit, recently branded as Catapult Creative Labs. Accepting the award, Jon Dorn, AIM’s SVP of digital and creative services, gave reference to the upheaval and associated challenges that have consumed the independent space of the magazine media industry for the last several years, predicting, “If we stick with this, it’ll be the most fascinating and satisfying time of our lives.” Events (tie): Dwell Presents The Monogram Modern Home – Dwell and Gingerbread BLVD – Taste of Homelast_img read more

USPS Reports Further Losses in Q3 2016USPS Reports Further Losses in Q3 2016

first_imgAnother quarter, another grim earnings statement from the Postal Service. As of now, savings afforded to publishers by the removal of the exigency surcharge have not translated to an increase in shipping. While overall volume remained stable, the periodicals class dipped 3.8 percent decline in the number of pieces shipped, to 1.43 billion, mirroring recent quarterly declines. Despite “encouraging numbers,” postmaster general Megan J. Brennan cautioned that the agency’s fiscal situation remains bleak. Regardless, renewed calls for a financial life preserver, perhaps in the form of a new surcharge or rate hike, will surely draw the attention of the publishing industry. The USPS argues that it needs around $12 billion in relief in order to return to solvency. Given the scope of the agency’s losses — $5.1 billion last year, and $5.5 billion the year before — those figures are difficult to dispute. Operating revenue saw another slight increase, to $16.64 billion (up 0.7 percent over last year), but the bump wasn’t nearly enough to offset a 12.4 percent increase in operating expenses and the termination of the exigency surcharge — a 4.3 percent premium which had applied to all classes of mail before expiring in April. The loss of the surcharge is expected to hurt USPS revenues by nearly $2 billion each year, according to the agency. “Net losses continue to mount,” Brennan said in a prepared statement. “Our results in the quarter further underscore the need for legislative reform that provides the organization with greater financial stability.” It’s the 41st consecutive quarter in which less periodicals were shipped than in the corresponding period the year before, and overall volume in the periodicals class has fallen 37.8 percent from a quarterly high of 2.3 billion in the third quarter of 2006. USPS chief finanical officer Joseph Corbett blamed lackluster revenue growth in the face of mounting losses on the termination of the exigency surcharge, which he termed a “mandated price reduction” in a statement. The Postal Service itself estimates that it lost $450 million during the quarter as a result of the surcharge’s expiration, still not nearly enough to approach profitability. “They have to understand that it’s a different age,” Cregan told Folio: in April, at the time the exigency surcharge was rolled back. “They’re not the only game in town anymore, and they have to improve their customer relations and understand that we — that is, the MPA — are their customers.” The agency posted a net loss of $1.57 billion for the third quarter of its fiscal year (April 1 to June 30), more than double the $586 million loss recorded over the same period in 2015. But representatives for the publishing industry, like the MPA’s EVP of government affairs, James Cregan, argue that the Postal Service needs to retain its clients more than it needs legislative assistance.last_img read more