NJ DEP’s Debbie Mans Talks About State Conservation Efforts

first_imgMans explained that the NJDEP is looking both outward and inward to see where the state can plug into federal clean energy initiatives, as well as act as a leader.Mans spoke of an executive order signed by Murphy in May that set a goal of 3,500 megawatts of offshore wind capacity to be generated off New Jersey’s coast by the year 2030.“This is an area where we’re playing a bit of catch up with other coastal states,” Mans said, noting recently announced projects in Massachusetts and New York.The NJDEP has pinpointed four favorable sites at least three miles off the coast of southern New Jersey in federally regulated waters. The state recently concluded several stakeholder meetings, including one in Belmar, and is currently in the midst of a public comment period to better understand the ramifications of developing these sites and what impact they may have on surrounding wildlife, including bird migrations. UPHOLDING PARIS AGREEMENTMans also stated that New Jersey had joined the United States Climate Alliance, a bipartisan coalition of 16 states and Puerto Rico, which is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement.President Donald Trump announced in June that he intends to pull the country out of the international accord on Nov. 4, 2020 – the earliest possible withdrawal date – due to cost concerns, job loss and negative impacts on the coal industry.“Just because the United States pulled out of it doesn’t mean that we as a state can’t go and achieve the goals,” Mans said. “There’s a lot we can be doing locally and as a state to make a difference.”This article was first published in the July 26-Aug. 2, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times. Mans said. “And we can step in to help groups and municipalities financially to purchase land, if and when they find a willing seller.”CLEAN ENERGY BY 2050 “For a long time we did have a state plan that really did try to direct nodes of growth and open space preservation, in conjunction with counties and local entities. And that’s sort of been withering on the vine for the past few years,” said Mans, who was appointed to the NJDEP in February after serving as the executive director of the Keyport-based NY/NJ Baykeeper. By Chris Rotolo | HOLMDEL – Monmouth County is rapidly developing vacant land along its highways and waterfront, but there is a renewed desire by the state to preserve open space.At a July 16 meeting of local environmentalists in Holmdel, deputy commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) Debbie Mans, said state planning could have an impact on conservation efforts. With approximately 25 members of the Holmdel-based Citizens for Informed Land Use organization in attendance, Mans discussed NJDEP’s agenda under Murphy, including a commitment to completely renewable clean energy by 2050.One aspect of that process includes the NJDEP rejoining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a cooperative effort among 10 Northeast and mid-Atlantic states to cap and reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector, including the placement of mandatory compliance obligations on fossil-fueled power plants.THE POWER OF WIND Though Mans understands that most land use choices are decided at the municipal and county levels, she did state that Gov. Phil Murphy is interested in bringing the idea of conservation back to the forefront with state planning.The mindset of Mans and Murphy is aligned with Two River-area citizens groups like the Neighbors for Waterfront Property in Atlantic Highlands who are working to preserve one of the last remaining tracts of undeveloped land on the Bayshore from being developed into 21 homes, and those in Middletown who are entrenched in a battle to hinder the Village 35 project.“A lot of these choices are very local, but when our regulations are triggered we have permitting authority,”last_img read more

Pirates back in series with B-Sens after 3-2 victory

first_imgIt’s looking like a road team series in the AHL Calder Cup Atlantic Division Finals between the Binghamton Senators, the farm team of the NHL’s Ottawa Senators and Portland Pirates.Tim Conboy’s goal with 13 seconds left to play in regulation broke a 2-2 tie to power the Portland Pirates a 3-2 victory over the B-Sens in the Atlantic Division Finals Saturday in Binghamton.The B-Sens still lead the best-of-seven series 2-1 with game four set for Monday at the Broome County Arena in Binghamton. Binghamton won the first two games of the series in Portland by 3-2 and 5-3.Ryan Keller and Kaspars Daugavins handled the scoring for the B-Sens, each chipping in their fifth goal of the playoffs.Ryan Potulny added his team-leading 17th point with a helper in the first in the losing effort.Robin Lehner continued his fine play in net for the Binghamton, stopping 30 of 33 shots faced.Binghamton defenceman and Nelson Minor Hockey grad Geoff Kinrade finished the game a minus-1.last_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 14, 2016

first_imgIN ANY LANGUAGE, CHAO CHOM’S A WINNERConsidering the owner doesn’t speak English and the trainer doesn’t speak Thai, S. Sandow, Inc. and Gary Stute have a business relationship made in heaven.Stute trains Chao Chom for Sandow, who plans to be on hand when the upstart daughter of Tizbud runs in the Grade I La Brea Stakes for three-year-old fillies at seven furlongs on opening day, Dec. 26.“It’s a big step up for her but as long as I get (Kent) Desormeaux, I’ll be happy,” Stute said. It was Hall of Fame rider Desormeaux who piloted 8-1 Chao Chom to a 1 ¾-length upset over 1-9 favorite Enola Gray in the Betty Grable Stakes for California-breds at Del Mar Nov. 13.“He’s got those magic hands,” Stute said of Desormeaux, who was riding the filly for the first time. “He had a chance to ride another filly in the Betty Grable, but that owner wanted to try somebody else.”Stute said Chao Chom’s owner, who owns a business that collects trash in Bangkok, usually visits the United States later in the year but is coming in specifically to see Chao Chom run in the La Brea.“The difficult part of our relationship is, I don’t speak Thai and he doesn’t speak English, and I’ve been training for him 15 years,” Gary said. “My Dad (retired trainer Mel Stute) loves them. Every time they come here, his wife gives him a hundred-dollar bill.”Chao Chom worked six furlongs on Santa Anita’s main track Tuesday in a bullet 1:12.20 under jockey Juan Ochoa. STORYBOOK HORSE LEAVES BIG VOID FOR SHERMAN      The penultimate chapter in California Chrome’s fairytale career is scheduled to unfold Saturday at Los Alamitos Race Course, as the soon to be 6-year-old California-bred son of Lucky Pulpit readies for a highly anticipated rematch with Arrogate in the inaugural $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational Jan. 28 at Gulfstream Park–Chrome’s farewell race before being retired to stud at Taylor Made Farm in Nicholasville, Ky.“He looks very good,” trainer Art Sherman said three days after Chrome had his final workout for the Los Alamitos Winter Challenge. “He’s been training forwardly and I look for him to run a decent race.”If all goes well after Saturday, plans call for Chrome to leave for Florida on Jan. 6 “and train at Gulfstream prior to the race.”California Chrome will leave a gaping chasm not only in racing but in America’s mainstream. Winner of the Kentucky Derby in 2014 when he was named Horse of the Year, California Chrome won the $10 million Dubai World Cup last March, was second by a half-length to champion-in-waiting Arrogate in the Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita Nov. 5 and is North America’s all-time leading money earner with $14,452,650, boasting a 15-4-1 record from 25 starts.Chrome’s life as a stallion will require an adjustment for both horse and trainer.“When I look at that stall and see he’s not in there, it will be a void for me,” Sherman said. “But he’s got some great mares lined up, so I’m hoping he’ll be a really decent stud.”That, of course, remains to be seen. Meanwhile, Sherman can’t complain.“It’s been one helluva ride for me,” said the Brooklyn native who turns 80 come Feb. 17. “He’s a once-in-a-lifetime horse. Every trainer hopes he can have a horse like him and I was lucky enough to have him. It’s been great for me, my family and friends.”While the California Chrome story on the race track is due to end Jan. 28 at Gulfstream Park, his untarnished tale of the turf could live on in perpetuity.Sherman said a book that would be authored by Daily Racing Form’s Eclipse Award-winning Executive Columnist Jay Hovdey has been discussed.“There are a lot of memories,” Sherman said. “I can tell you that.” SANTA ANITA OFFERS POPULAR WALL CALENDAR AND MUCH MORE OPENING DAY            In addition to four graded stakes, Santa Anita Park will again treat fans to its popular 2017 wall calendar and much more with the beginning of its traditional Winter Meet on Monday, Dec. 26. A fan favorite for decades, the Santa Anita 2017 wall calendar will be given free of charge to all attendees with paid admission. With a pair of Grade I stakes, the Malibu and the La Brea leading the way, Santa Anita’s Winter Meet opener will again command center stage among racing fans nationwide.Mathis Brothers Furniture, for whom the opening day Grade II, $200,000 Mathis Brothers Mile is named, will provide a plush Thoroughbred toy to the first 5,000 kids 12 and under, as well as Mathis Brothers Gift certificates to all paid attendees. Santa Anita will also provide a Family Fun Zone in its spacious Infield Area. (General Admission and parking are free in the Infield, via Gate 6 off of Colorado Place).Santa Anita’s luxurious Chandelier Room will again play host to the highly acclaimed Guest Chef Series as one of LA’s hottest restaurants will provide contemporary cuisine and post-holiday celebration. Ticketing, available online, includes innovative signature dishes throughout the afternoon, six delicious whiskey tastings, live music, a racing program, a wagering tip sheet and more. To purchase tickets, please visit santaanita.com/events.With first post time set at 12 noon, admission gates will open at 10 a.m.Here’s a schedule of opening day events:–Grade I, $300,000 Malibu Stakes for 3-year-olds at seven furlongs.            –Grade I, $300,000 La Brea Stakes for 3-year-old fillies at seven furlongs            –Grade II, $200,000 Mathis Brothers Mile (turf) for 3-year-olds            –Grade III, $100,000 San Simeon Stakes for 3-year-olds and up, at 6 ½ furlongs down hillside turf             –Free 2017 Santa Anita Wall Calendar             –Free Mathis Brothers plush Thoroughbred toy to first 5,000 kids 12 and under            –A Mathis Brothers Gift Certificate, free with paid admission            –Craft Beer and Cider Festival on Grandstand Apron (packages available at santaanita.com/events)            –Guest Chef Series in the Chandelier Room featuring a catered menu from one of LA’s hottest restaurants, delicious whiskey tastings, live music and more, visit santaanita.com/events for details            –Infield Family Fun Zone featuring pony rides and much more, visit santaanita.com/events            –Bud Light Lounge, all you can eat buffet, first beer included, racing program and more, visit santaanita.com/events            Entries for opening day races will be taken Wednesday, Dec. 21. For more racing and event information, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE. CLASSIC WINNER ARROGATE DRILLS FOR 2017 DEBUTLANGUAGE BARRIER NO PROBLEM FOR GARY STUTESANTA ANITA WINTER MEET STARTS MONDAY, DEC. 26CHROME’S FAREWELL CALIFORNIA RACE SATURDAYcenter_img ARROGATE COULD RUN IN SAN PASQUAL STAKES JAN. 1Juddmonte Farm’s Arrogate, who upset fan favorite California Chrome in the Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita on Nov. 6, worked five furlongs Tuesday at The Great Race Place in a bullet 58.40, fastest of 77 drills at the distance, the average time of which was 1:01.39.Trainer Bob Baffert told bloodhorse.com that Arrogate could make his 2017 debut in the Grade II, $200,000 San Pasqual Stakes at 1 1/16 miles on Jan. 1, which could lead to the $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 28.Martin Garcia was aboard for the drill.“When he came back, he was just full of himself, it was like nothing for him,” Baffert said of Arrogate. “He’s so impressive. After retiring American Pharoah, I never dreamt I would be dealing with another horse of his caliber, but he’s just getting stronger and better every day.” FINISH LINES: As is its tradition, Santa Anita begins its Winter Meet at 12 noon the day after Christmas, Dec. 26, which falls on a Monday but is considered a holiday since Christmas is on a Sunday. Santa Anita will be dark for live racing Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 27 and 28, and resume live racing Thursday, Dec. 29, at 12:30 p.m. . . . The California Horse Racing Board will conduct its regular monthly meeting 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at Los Alamitos Race Course. An audio-only webcast of the Board meeting can be heard through a link on the CHRB website (webcast). The public is encouraged to attend.last_img read more

Beagle 2 Still Lost, But Beagle 1 Found

first_imgExplorers have found partial remains of Darwin’s lost ship, the HMS Beagle, in a swamp near Kent, reports BBC News (see also Science Now).  The ill-fated Beagle 2 on Mars, however, may take another 168 years to find.  And it has no water to float in; results from the twin Mars Exploration Rovers are inconclusive about the presence of water on the red planet.Let’s hope the Charlie’s boat doesn’t become a religious shrine (see 02/13/2004 entry).(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img

Things in Space that Shouldn’t Be

first_imgA history of astronomy and a history of surprise discoveries in space would track pretty well.  Recent stories show that the trend continues even today.Wet moon:  The moon was thought to be depleted of volatiles – until now.  According to PhysOrg, “Researchers discover water on the moon is widespread, similar to Earth’s.”  Shouldn’t all this have been known since the Apollo astronauts brought back rocks from the moon?  Well, researchers at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville have re-analyzed some samples and are “once again turning what scientists thought they knew about the moon on its head,” the article exclaimed.    They don’t mean they found lakes and oceans there (despite the Latin root for Mare, ocean).  Instead, they detected molecular water elements or “lunar dew” in apatite similar to amounts in Earth basalts.  Their paper, published in Nature,1 said, “Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks.”    What does this mean?  “One possible implication,” the abstract stated, “is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought.”  And if volatiles are rich, the leading theory for the moon’s formation becomes poor.  PhysOrg explained:The finding of volatiles on the moon has deep implications for how it, and the Earth, formed.  It is generally believed that the moon was created when the early Earth was hit by a Mars-sized proto-planet called Theia, melting and vaporizing itself and a large chunk of the Earth.  The cloud of particles created by the impact later congealed to form the moon, which supposedly was devoid of highly volatile elements such as hydrogen and chlorine.  However, the researchers’ discovery of these volatiles challenges this theory.    “If water in the Moon was residue water kept during the giant impact, it is surprising that water survived the impact at all because less volatile elements, such as sodium and potassium, are strongly depleted.  The details of the impact theory need to be re-examined,’ [Yang] Liu [U Tennessee] said.Theia appears poised to join Nemesis in the arsenal of imaginary terrorists (see 07/21/2010).Mercurial sleeper awakes:  “Every time we’ve encountered Mercury, we’ve discovered new phenomena.”  That’s PhysOrg quoting says MESSENGER principal investigator Sean Solomon [Carnegie Institution].  “We’re learning that Mercury is an extremely dynamic planet, and it has been so throughout its history.”    That’s a very different picture than a few years ago, when Mercury was supposed to be a dead world, long ago frozen into silence.  Solomon was remarking about Mercury’s young volcanism, magnetic substorms and ionic emissions from its thin atmosphere, discovered during two previous flybys.  The spacecraft will go into orbit around Mercury next March: “we’ll be in for a terrific show,” remarked Solomon.    See the pictures on BBC News about the youngest volcano found on Mercury so far.  Science Daily surveyed the most surprising finds, and National Geographic News focused on huge “curious” power surges detected in the planet’s atmosphere.  “There’re some things here we clearly do not understand,” said one scientist.Quakers in space:  Ever heard of spacequakes?  Those are impacts of plasma blobs from the sun on the Earth’s magnetic field.  Big ones can push the field all the way down to Earth’s surface, Space.com said, then they bounce like a tennis ball with decreasing amplitude.  The THEMIS spacecraft “discovered something new and surprising” in this “long suspected” phenomenon, the article said: “The surprise is plasma vortices, huge whirls of magnetized gas as wide as Earth itself, spinning on the verge of the quaking magnetic field.”    There are other quakers that have been discovered in space, too.  “Spacequakes aren’t the only unearthly temblors around,” Space.com said.  “Scientists have also discovered starquakes (violent trembling inside stars), moonquakes and asteroid quakes (seismic tremors on the surface of the moon and asteroids, respectively).”  Whole lot of shaking going on out there.Rings and hexagons:  Scientists from the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn shared a 6th anniversary CHARM teleconference this week (Cassini-Huygens Analysis and Results from the Mission).  Two Powerpoint presentations about the rings and atmosphere are available for download in PDF form (audio files may be posted later on).  An account of the number of surprises and phenomena not understood in the 100+ slides is left as an exercise; as teasers, they admitted that the B-ring edge is more dynamic and complex than can be understood (ditto for the F-ring), the rings may be much younger than Saturn, and the hexagon-shaped cloud pattern at Saturn’s north pole can only partially be modeled in the lab (audio is needed for full discussion).Super star:  According to theory, stars can only grow to about 150 times the mass of the sun, partly because they would burn out too quickly to be seen, partly because the winds would tear them apart, and partly because there is not enough gas and dust in most locales to gravitationally contract into a star much bigger than 150 solar masses.    Doubters, behold R136a1: a blue giant almost twice the theoretical size limit.  It is currently 265 times the sun’s mass, but astronomers estimate at birth it was a whopping 320 solar masses.  And talk about sunburn: its luminosity has been estimated at 10 million times brighter than our sun.  The BBC News said its radius is 30 times greater than our sun.  A diagram on National Geographic News illustrates the size difference.    Science Daily described the puzzle of this star: “Understanding how high mass stars form is puzzling enough, due to their very short lives and powerful winds, so that the identification of such extreme cases as R136a1 raises the challenge to theorists still further.”  Was it born big, or did it collect smaller stars into its household?  Astronomers were “really taken aback” by the discovery, National Geographic said, adding: “The discovery could rewrite the laws of stellar physics, since it’s long been thought that stars beyond a certain mass would be too unstable to survive.”The big burst:  Gamma ray bursts have been known since 1967, but an “extraordinary” one detected on June 21 was off the charts.  National Geographic News said that “Until now, scientists thought the brightest gamma-ray bursts sent out a maximum of 10,000 x-ray photons a second.”  Here’s the measured flux from this one: “145,000 photons a second… making this gamma-ray burst 10 to 15 times brighter than anything previously seen by Swift’s x-ray telescope.  It was so bright it “blinded” the Swift orbiting space telescope temporarily, saturating its detectors: the “rush of light from a minute-long gamma-ray burst proved so overwhelming that Swift’s data processing software temporarily shut down.”    Swift normally catches light from about two gamma ray bursts per week.  Space.com said this super-bright one is stirring theories: “Just when we were beginning to think that we had seen everything that gamma-ray bursts could throw at us, this burst came along to challenge our assumptions about how powerful their X-ray emissions can be,” said Neil Gehrels, principal investigator for Swift.    A new mission named Xenia is being planned to watch for these cosmic beacons.  “The newfound burst, he said, means that Xenia mission designers will have to go back to the drawing board to make sure the probe will be able to handle the brightest flashes the universe can dish out.”  And speaking of explosions, Science Daily reported earlier this month that among the best-understood ones, Type 1a supernovae, the “Origin of Key Cosmic Explosions [Is] Still a Mystery.”There’s no indication that the number of surprising discoveries will decrease over the next few years.  Quite the contrary; an article on PhysOrg about early results from the Herschel Space Observatory with its SPIRE camera quoted Ian Smail of Durham University, who analyzes results from the mission: “It is already clear that we live in a changing Universe and, thanks to Herschel and SPIRE, few things are changing faster than our perception of it.”    Looking back over 400 years of astronomy since Galileo and Kepler, Joseph Burns of Cornell University surveyed the many surprising discoveries made in space, especially in the last 5 decades of the space program: the Van Allen belts; Venus’s young surface; old, cold moons that proved surprisingly active; old, cold comets that showed evidence of hot formation; asteroids thought to be hard rock that turn out to be rubble piles; remarkable dynamism in Saturn’s rings; chaotic motions of moons; and more.  “Few scientists envisaged that the neighbouring worlds explored by space missions would be so diverse, nor how entrancing many are.”  Publishing his account in Nature,2 (see also summary on Space.com), using the word “surprising” a number of times, he quoted a character from Tom Stoppard’s novel Arcadia in his conclusion talking about scientific revolutions: “It’s the best possible time to be alive, when almost everything you thought you knew is wrong.”1.  Boyce, Liu et al, “Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances,” Nature 466, pp 466�469, 2 July 2010, doi:10.1038/nature09274.2.  Joseph Burns, “The four hundred years of planetary science since Galileo and Kepler,” Nature 466, pp 575�584, 29 July 2010, doi:10.1038/nature09215.If some scientists want to celebrate their ignorance, some of us will be happy to supply the conical hats and party blowers.  To Joe’s list we can add many more surprises that, within the living memory of many of us, hit the astronomers broadside: quasars, pulsars, blazars, gamma-ray bursts, the cosmic microwave background radiation (partly predicted, but not to the expected values; see 06/12/2008), mature galaxies at the farthest distances (04/02/2009), gravitational lenses (partly predicted), silence from SETI, transient lunar phenomena, Io’s volcanoes, the Enceladus geysers, the inhospitable surfaces of Venus and Mars (civilizations were expected there into the 1960s), Ganymede’s magnetic field, the Kuiper belt, minor planets beyond Pluto, the lack of organics and carbonates (and life) on Mars, the tilted magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune, the rings of Jupiter and Uranus and Neptune, the F-ring of Saturn, the geysers of Triton, binary asteroids… where could we stop?  It’s hard to find any object in space that closely matched what astronomers expected.  While we share the thrill of surprising discoveries with the astronomers, we should not treat them as prophets.  They have a lot of whiz at math (01/08/2010) and access to great equipment (12/08/2009), but are as fallible as the rest of us – though occasionally, the luck of discovery comes to the prepared minds.    Astronomy proceeds along two tracks: the theory track, and the data track.  Physicists at chalkboards derive equations that predict what might be found or try to explain what is found (03/28/2010, 01/20/2010, 01/13/2010).  Observational astronomers gather the raw data with telescopes.  Sometimes these tracks intersect.  Sometimes one precedes the other.  One might expect that observation would lead theory, trying to make sense of new observations.  Often, though, theory leads to discoveries.  Theory can even determine what observations get made, and what an astronomer “sees” with the senses – as when today’s astronomers pursue their mad quest (08/03/2009) for dark matter (02/28/2008) and dark energy (07/17/2010, 10/08/2009).  If the observations in the past 5 decades have been surprising, the theories have been even more so (06/30/2008): inflation (02/24/2009, 04/18/2008), black holes with universes inside them (04/10/2010), parallel universes, and the multiverse (02/22/2010, 12/05/2008).  While one would hope observations would constrain theory (08/26/2009), some of the latest theoretical speculations seem like acts of desperation to maintain beliefs in spite of the observations (03/19/2010, 10/28/2009, 09/28/2009, 11/17/2008; cf. 10/29/2007).    We’re all together for the ride on our planetary spaceship.  We have been given a phenomenal platform for scientific discovery (watch The Privileged Planet on YouTube).  Fallible as we all are, it should not be surprising to be surprised by what we find, as we peer farther into the unknown with better instruments.  What is surprising is for any of us to grant prophetic powers (both in terms of prediction and understanding) to a class of fellow mortals (06/23/2009, 10/16/2008), just because they label themselves scientists (03/10/2010, 01/15/2008).  The spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets.  As new data comes rolling in from Kepler, MESSENGER, Herschel, Planck and future missions, let’s keep the marketplace open and a lively place for debate and critical thinking.(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Cold, wet weather can lead to purple corn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt Hutcheson, CCA, product manager, Seed Consultants, Inc.For much of the eastern Corn Belt, it has been too wet to plant this spring. However, in some areas corn has been planted is emerging or in the early growth stages of development. One phenomenon that commonly occurs at the early stages of the growing season is the appearance of purple corn plants. Corn plants can turn purple for several reasons related to environmental factors such as:Sunny days and cool nights (temps in the 40s to 50s F)Soil pH lower than 5.5Cool temperaturesWet soilStresses that hinder the uptake of phosphorusHerbicide injurySoil compaction.Because many fields have saturated soils and the forecast includes cooler nights and continued wet weather, producers may see some purple plants in their fields. Purpling in corn due to cooler weather most often occurs when plants are in the V2 to V5 growth stages. Because of diverse genetics, hybrids react differently to early stress and some will exhibit purpling while others will not. Anyone who has walked a test plot to observe early plant vigor or has split their planter between two hybrids has probably seen a side-by-side comparison where one hybrid turned purple while the other did not.The biggest concern for corn growers is usually about whether or not plants that turn purple will diminish corn yields. If the purpling is caused by a temporary stress (sunny days and cool nights, cool temperatures, wet soil, etc.) it will disappear when soils dry out and temperatures increase allowing for normal corn development. Temporary stresses generally do not affect yield. However, if the purpling is symptom caused by a problem that doesn’t go away with a change in the weather (soil compaction, herbicide injury, etc.) yield could be negatively affected.last_img read more

DIY Democracy: Civic Participation for the iPhone

first_imgHave you ever heard someone proclaim that if you don’t vote, then you shouldn’t complain? Well, whether or not you vote, we have the perfect iPhone app to make your complaints heard by whatever government official, agency or otherwise – DIY Democracy.This handy little government 2.0 app will let you make that wheel squeak even louder, all while informing you of your rights. And for the true civic participant on the go, you can even petition to run for office without interrupting your day.DIY Democracy is a location enabled app that, although currently only fully-functional for California residents, connects its users with all the various levels of government. The app is a project of the Prometheus Institute, a public policy non-profit organization.The app is divided into four primary categories: Rights & Laws, Representatives, Take Action and Public Forum. Each of the first three are separated into the various levels of government, whether local, state or federal.The “Rights & Laws” section is a pocket reference to laws concerning all sorts of handy things, like due process or search and seizure. The app not only quotes the law directly, but offers a layman’s interpretation. Of course, this is accompanied by a standard caveat that the information is for education only, but they seem to do a decent job of explaining “how it’s generally applied in real life.” In many ways, it’s like having a pocket constitution, but broken down for easy access. “Representatives” offers a full listing of government officials, from Barack Obama to your local alderman, and each with contact information such as phone number, email address and website. The “Public Forums” are just that and, while we imagine the types of people that use this app to be the vocal sorts, we’re not so sure a message forum is quite tailored to the iPhone. That said, the forums are also available on the web, but we question their true utility in this instance.Moving on, the final section, “Take Action”, is the one that really caught our attention. We reviewed an app yesterday called GoRequest, that offered similar capabilities, but this one seems to take it a step further. DIY Democracy brings the various levels and offices of government to you with pre-formatted, well-written letters for the on-the-go complaint. Whether you want to run for office, contest the validity of a law, or simply report a pothole or road hazard, DIY Democracy is set to connect you with the proper authorities. It does all of this, of course, with your exact location in mind, so when you report that pothole, or dangerously dangling tree limb, the local department of public works will get exact GPS coordinates in addition to whatever other description you offer. In addition to GPS coordinates and pre-formatted letter templates, you can of course directly attach both photos and video, making options like “Contact Mayor” seem a little less silly. If an issue is urgent enough, get the evidence and send it off to the officials. We can only hope to see this app come out for more locations than California. While it’s nifty that it goes all the way to the top, we find that being able to directly interact with your local government and report issues as seen on the ground is probably the more likely use for this app. DIY Democracy is available for download in the App Store. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts mike melansoncenter_img Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#Government#Location#mobile#NYT#web The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Filmmaking Tips: The Basics of Shooting A Dialogue Scene

first_imgPlanning a two-person dialogue scene in your next film or video project? Here’s everything you need to know to pull off the shoot.Cover image by guruXOX.Dialogue is just as important in film and video as it is in real life. Even during the early days of silent cinema, dialogue was a necessary aspect of storytelling — through dialogue cards and captions. In modern film and video, dialogue scenes are the crux of narrative development.If you’re working on conversational scenes in your own project, follow these steps to get good coverage, a good audio recording, and proper editing.Shots to ConsiderImage by IxMaster.Let’s start with the basics. Say you’re shooting a two-person conversation. The situation is the same in everything from cinema classics to modern sitcoms: you have two stationary actors talking back and forth. As a filmmaker, you want to maximize and stylize your coverage for a mix of wide and close-up shots. Here are a few shots to consider:A wide two-shot.OTS of each subject (over-the-shoulder).Close-ups of each person talking.Close-ups of each person listening and reacting.Cutaways (aspects of the scene for cutaways in the edit). Lighting SetupsImage by gnepphoto.Lighting becomes tricky when shooting your dialogue scenes — especially if you’re not using a single-camera setup. With a single camera, it’s common practice to shoot from wide to close-ups. Once you’re not in a two-shot anymore (and have moved beyond over-the-shoulder framing), you only need a lighting setup for one individual. To help your actors, the other participant in the conversation can still say his or her lines — or you can use a stand-in.If you are shooting multiple cameras, you’ll have to plan accordingly to light both characters equally for all angles of coverage. Here’s a great article about how and why sitcoms use three-camera setups (and the lighting problems filmmakers have had to solve over the years) to get complete coverage of dialogue-heavy content.Recording Audio OptionsImage by guruXOX.After setting your shots, audio becomes your next biggest concern. Working with two people in a static position doesn’t present too many challenges, though, so your traditional options are definitely still on the table. The real challenge is when you add more people (especially when they start talking over one another) and movement. Here are some basic approaches:Boom overhead.Boom under.Lapel mics on each person.Audio recorder hidden between both.The decision comes down to getting quality audio from both subjects. If you’re booming both, you’ll need to be positioned perfectly or quick to pivot to catch each person’s dialogue. If you’re mic-ing both, be wary of cross chat and picking up too much of the other person.Editing a Dialogue SceneImage by Tero Vesalainen.When editing a dialogue scene, your main goal is to clearly present who is speaking and what they’re saying. If your shots were captured well and your audio recorded clearly, you’ll have an easier time and some flexibility for experimentation. However, if you need to cover mistakes from the shoot, you’ll be need to be creative to fill in missing information.Some basic tips for editing a dialogue scene:Start with the two-shot to establish the characters and their environment.Alternate close-ups of each person when they talk.Use reaction shots only when needed.Use cutaways as elements in the environment are mentioned. More Advanced TipsImage by gnepphoto.Once you’ve got the basics down, you can begin adding other elements, like additional characters, outside noises, and movement. Even keeping your camera stationary and letting your characters move around a little bit can create new problems you’ll have to solve. (It gets even tricker when your camera is in motion.) For more advanced tips and tricks when shooting dialogue-heavy scenes, check out some of these resources:How To Capture Smooth Walk-and-Talk Shots Without A Movi Or SteadicamTips For Keeping A Long Dialogue Scene Visually InterestingHow to Light an Exterior Day Scene Without LightingPremiere Pro Tips for Editing and Mixing Audio, Music, and SFXHow to Direct Scenes Containing Minimal Dialoguelast_img read more

10 months agoMan Utd blocked Mourinho buying Aldeweireld

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd blocked Mourinho buying Aldeweireldby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United blocked former manager Jose Mourinho from signing Tottenham defender Toby Alderweireld.The Mirror says United’s board ‘vetoed’ Mourinho’s move for Alderweireld for tactical reasons.Mourinho was axed by United in December after the club recorded their worst ever start to a Premier League campaign.The Portuguese was vocal throughout his final months, however, that the club needed to sign a new centre-half.Belgium international Alderweireld fit the bill with his contract nearing expiry at Tottenham. last_img