Photo library: Business and industry 3

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Business & Industry contact sheet (1.8MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Keneuwe Monakale tests water quality at the pre-brew plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Cleaning the filtration plate area at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Cleaning the filtration plate area at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The brewhouse at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff.Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Robertson Hlatshwyo works in the labelling plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 3: {loadposition business}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library?Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

Uplifting township kids with music

first_imgVodacom Change The World volunteer Tammy Dutton has set up a 40-foot shipping container that was converted into two sound-proofed music classrooms for the children of Umlazi. Each container classroom has 12 guitars, three keyboards, two bass guitars, a drum kit, two microphones and five amplifiers.(Images: Vodacom)MEDIA CONTACTS • Tammy Dutton +27 82 620 85 73RELATED ARTICLES• Getting internet from the sun• Up-cycling for a better community• Pupils have a blast with Mathletes• Cartier finalist fights illiteracy in SA• Free MBA education for anyone• Three for one in educationCadine PillayA music school in the Durban township of Umlazi is helping vulnerable and orphaned children get off the streets and become involved in more productive activities.With the help of South African mobile telecommunications company Vodacom, and consumer company Godrej SA, Tammy Dutton ambitiously set up a 40-foot shipping container that was converted into two sound-proofed music classrooms for the children of Umlazi.Classes in containersEach container classroom, donated by Godrej SA, has 12 guitars, three keyboards, two bass guitars, a drum kit, two microphones and five amplifiers; all instruments were bought by Godrej SA and Glenwood Village Music.The music lessons are taught by a passionate young man named Nhlakanipho Mahoyi who is paid a small salary. Mahoyi is there on a formal basis, but is also present on an informal level to act as a role model and to help those children who spend extra time in the container practising their newly acquired skills.Umlazi is home to many orphaned and vulnerable children and Dutton was placed in the region by the non-profit organisation, Noah, as part of its worldwide network of protective Arks. Being a volunteer for Vodacom Change The World, Dutton is also sponsored by Vodacom to be there.She spends most of the day with children aged two to five years during school hours at the Ark at Sithokozise Primary School, part of Noah. She also runs an aftercare programme for children from Grade 1 all the way up to matric. “I noticed that the older children and teens got easily bored and needed something constructive to keep them entertained and off the street,” Dutton explains.‘A minute learning an instrument is a minute off the street’So she approached her friend, Andrew Ord, a musician, with the concept of a music school. “I approached Andrew with an idea to offer a music programme to these kids with the idea that a minute learning an instrument is a minute off the streets,” she says. “It is a healthy outlet that takes them a long time to master.” The two presented the concept to Godrej SA, which immediately wanted to get on board.“What impressed me most was how everyone came together for the project,” Dutton says. “Glenwood Village Music provided us with instruments in a short space of time; Isivuno Containers gave us a huge discount on the container and teachers and community members pitched in as well,” she explains. “It is amazing what can be achieved when companies, suppliers and community members collaborate to create something that will benefit so many children.”Improving lives at an early ageAlthough music has the ability to entertain and inspire, it is also capable of healing, building bridges and improving the lives of less fortunate people as well as of children. Dutton shares the story of a little girl who was extremely shy and hardly spoke: “I had the privilege of watching her fall in love with a guitar, slowly at first, just by touching it and feeling it beneath her fingers. Now she is learning to play and one can hardly recognise her.“She is full of sunshine and smiles,” Dutton says proudly. Another little boy exhibited behavioural problems until he realised that he was a natural on any instrument placed in his grasp. “He ran out on to the street calling his friends and now they all spend most afternoons in the music container, constructively entertained.”A library was also desperately needed by Sithokozise Primary School and Godrej SA, passionate about equipping children with as much as possible, generously donated another container that the Ark volunteers converted into a library. “The school can now use this whereas previously they had absolutely no space to even receive donations,” Dutton says. “All of the children were extremely humbled to receive new books – the first time for many of them.”last_img read more

10 months agoMan Utd blocked Mourinho buying Aldeweireld

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd blocked Mourinho buying Aldeweireldby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United blocked former manager Jose Mourinho from signing Tottenham defender Toby Alderweireld.The Mirror says United’s board ‘vetoed’ Mourinho’s move for Alderweireld for tactical reasons.Mourinho was axed by United in December after the club recorded their worst ever start to a Premier League campaign.The Portuguese was vocal throughout his final months, however, that the club needed to sign a new centre-half.Belgium international Alderweireld fit the bill with his contract nearing expiry at Tottenham. last_img

6 days agoLampard happy for Pulisic as he inspires Chelsea win

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Lampard happy for Pulisic as he inspires Chelsea winby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard praised Christian Pulisic after he came off the bench to help them to a 1-0 win over Newcastle United.Pulisic replaced Mason Mount just after the hour mark, with the hosts struggling to find a way past a determined Toon defence, and played a key part in setting up Marcos Alonso’s 73rd minute winner.”I’m really pleased for him,” Lampard said. “He’s a hot topic because of the price tag. Because of his status in his national team, and his world status through that. And everyone has got a little bit carried away with the short term.“The long term is that he’s come here and he’s just turned 21 and to see him play like he did today, and there’s a lot more to come.“It’s not the end story. You can see his balance and awareness and you can see how he can play.“And there’s improvement to come as with all the young players, but delighted for him because he will feel good about that. And he should do because he was a big part of us winning that game.” last_img read more

5 days agoLiverpool manager Klopp: No chance Salah could’ve faced Man Utd

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Liverpool manager Klopp: No chance Salah could’ve faced Man Utdby Freddie Taylor5 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool manager Jurgen Klopp says there was no way Mohamed Salah could have faced Manchester United on Sunday.The Reds missed Salah’s attacking spark against United’s low-block, with the game ending in a 1-1 draw.”Mo was not ready, that’s how it is,” Klopp told Sky Sports.”He couldn’t train with the team; I don’t know where it came from that everybody said he will play. “There was pretty much no chance for today, maybe for Wednesday, we have to see.” last_img

MSI Shipping Faces a Stormy Road to Recovery

first_imgzoom The shipping industry is set to experience a stormy road to recovery, with uneven supply/demand trends set to test the nerve of investors and operators, according to research and consultancy firm Maritime Strategies International (MSI).Addressing the Hansa Forum in Hamburg, Germany this week, MSI Senior Analyst James Frew warned that the industry will continue to face multiple challenges to a sustained recovery despite positive demand fundamentals.“The commodity shipping sectors remain well correlated with each other – with the exception of offshore and LPG – and most sectors are positively correlated, but not tightly so,” Frew said, adding that the question is “whether it is supply or demand that is wrecking the markets?”In demand terms, headline trade in goods and services has stalled in relation to GDP and policy decisions rather than fundamentals, hold the key to future direction. Factors including increased energy efficiency, slowing containerisation demand and reshoring are all threats. However, the demand side is far from all bad news.According to MSI data, ships required versus ships on order exceed projected demand for product tankers and chemical carriers but lag for bulk carriers and containerships. This is thanks to the industry’s self-prescribed medicine, with 2016 scrapping levels at or near record levels in the bulk carrier and containership sectors.“The recovery is going to be uneven at best, with a disproportionate increase in vessel earnings for LNG carriers, tankers and LPG carriers. Even with improvements, earnings for containerships and bulkers will not approach their pre-crisis highs,” Frew said.He added that shipyards will continue “to suffer from a lack of forward cover next year and only cost pressure will stop newbuilding prices falling further in 2018.”last_img read more

CBREs 2018 forecast shows flat real estate market in Calgary

first_imgAfter years of recession, Calgary’s economy seems to be turning around and CBRE’s 2018 real estate forecast suggests that is good news for the market.CBRE’s Alberta Regional Managing Director Greg Kwong doesn’t see any major distress this year.On the retail side, the most volatile segment of the market, expect the up and down to continue.“Certainly a lot of churn,” said Kwong. “We haven’t seen a major increase in our vacancy rate and we’re still seeing smaller regional shopping centres being built in some of the newer areas.”There are green shoots of hiring which is good news when it comes to office space and vacancy rates will remain flat, at around 26 per cent. Kwong said it will likely be like that for the next few years.“There’s no real sentiment that we’re going to bounce back and be back to a 2 per cent vacancy and that all those people that lost their jobs are going to be back in the next two months,” he explained.The situation is also helped by the fact there aren’t any huge office towers opening.Industrial space continues to be in high demand in Calgary with the vacancy rate continuing to dip this year.The multi-family rental market is improving. Vacancies are expected to be about 6 per cent, a full percentage point lower than 2016, with average 2-bedroom going for $1,250. The number of new units will also be half that of 2017.last_img read more

Much left to fight for beyond legalization pot activists say as they

first_imgTORONTO – Cannabis activists say although this year’s 4-20 celebrations across the country will likely be the last before recreational pot use becomes legal, there’s still a lot to fight for.The federal government has committed to making marijuana legal by the summer, but the task of regulating the sale and consumption of the drug has been handed down to the provinces and territories.Lisa Campbell with the Ontario Cannabis Consumer and Retail Alliance said she doesn’t think 4-20 events across the country will disappear with the new legalized system — but they will likely evolve.“There is still a lot to fight for, including cannabis lounges, consumption spaces and having special events permits. But there comes a certain point where you can shout from the sidelines or you can put down your protest sign and have a chance to work with government to influence policy,” Campbell said.“For me and my activism, I’ve gone from fully disobeying the law and civil disobedience to now pausing my illicit activity and trying to find a way to work in the legal market.”The provinces have been rolling out their plans on regulating legalized pot. Ontario, for instance, intends to sell marijuana to people 19 and older in up to 150 stores run by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario. Consumption in public spaces or workplaces will be banned.Campbell said she wants to see a mixed retail model in the province, with regulated lounges and bars where marijuana can be purchased and consumed.“The only benefit to government stores is that argument that if you’re going to regulate it like alcohol, that we also need to have all these other licences that we have for alcohol,” Campbell said. “So, for example, at festivals there should be the ability to have a vapour lounge that is like a designated area like a beer garden, where you can purchase and consume cannabis.”She acknowledges that the province’s Ministry of the Attorney General has finished its consultation on cannabis consumption spaces, and it will take some time before changes are made.April 20 has long been a day to celebrate cannabis and the culture that surrounds it. In cities such as Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver, pot enthusiasts gather by the thousands in public squares, defying the authorities.But Campbell noted that 4-20 isn’t just about having a massive outdoor smokeout anymore; there are events such as cannabis business speeches from CEOs from publicly traded companies, as well as movie nights with cannabis edibles.She did say, however, that she’s concerned police will crack down harder on this year’s 4-20 events.“While legalization is exciting, I also think a lot of people are fearful,” she says.Abi Roach, the owner of Toronto’s Hotbox Cafe, says she has heard similar concerns from customers as police continue to crack down on illegal pot dispensaries in the city ahead of this summer’s legislative change.She says with legalization looming, her activism will also centre on creating safe public spaces for cannabis consumption and fighting against what she called the “white-collarization of cannabis.“It’s the corporate takeover of big alcohol, big pharma, big tobacco, now taking over cannabis and creating a business that never really existed, looking for a customer base that isn’t interested in it,” Roach said.“I think the problem that not only corporations are going to have, but also the government stores, is how do you get my customers — the people we have been serving for the last 18 years — to switch from their current purchasing ways and go to the legal government stores?”She says governments need to include the current industry, which has been flourishing for decades, into the legal framework.“And that’s not happening and that’s what we’re fighting for,” she said.last_img read more

Scotiabank says pipeline constraints to cost economy 107 billion in 2018

first_imgThe costs come as delays continue for all three major proposed oil pipelines to export more oil from Western Canada, including Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion, Enbridge’s Line 3 replacement, and TransCanada’s Keystone XL.Canadian producers would need Line 3 and at least one of the other pipelines to go forward or face indefinite pipeline constraints that would have an impact on Canada’s well-being with consequences that extend well beyond Alberta, said Perrault.“The elevated discounts come with a steep economic cost, and represent to a large degree a self-inflicted wound,” he said.The latest economic impacts of the pipeline constraints come as Alberta and British Columbia continue to quarrel over the construction of the Trans Mountain project, pitting arguments of economic impact against the importance of protecting coastlines and limiting greenhouse gas emissions.The current squeeze in pipeline capacity has been expected for some time, but the leak and temporary shutdown on TransCanada’s Keystone pipeline last November sped up the problem, said Perrault.The shutdown led to oil storage tanks in Alberta to fill to record volumes and sent the spread between Western Canadian and U.S. crude to more than US$30 a barrel, while the regulator-imposed 20 percent reduced capacity on Keystone has continued to limit a recovery. The discount on Western Canadian oil production since the spill has hovered around US$24 a barrel, much higher than the US$13 spread for the past two years, and Scotiabank expects it to average US$21.6 a barrel for 2018.Western Canadian production is discounted somewhat both by quality and transportation costs, but has spiked several times in the past decade as pipeline space runs tight. CALGARY, A.B. — Delayed oil pipeline construction is causing a steep discount for Canadian crude prices that is costing the economy roughly $15.6 billion a year or about 0.75 percent of GDP, according to Scotiabank.“Pipeline approval delays have imposed clear, demonstrable and substantial economic costs on the Canadian economy,” said Scotiabank’s chief economist Jean-Francois Perrault in a report Tuesday.The discount, however, is expected to ease through the year as more rail capacity becomes available to ship oil, bringing the expected cost to roughly $10.7 billion or 0.5 percent of GDP for 2018 and then $7 billion or 0.3 percent of GDP a year until more pipeline capacity comes online.last_img read more

Council puts kibosh on allowing backyard hens

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Fort St. John City Council voted in favour of not reopening the issue of allowing residents to keep hens in their backyards, citing concerns from the SPCA.Last April, discussions to potentially allow residents to keep hens in their backyards were included in Council’s June strategic planning sessions. But on January 8th the discussion item, which included discussions about the hens along with cat regulations, was dropped from Council’s Works in Progress list after Mayor Lori Ackerman indicated that the topics weren’t included in the strategic plan.Resident Lance Bayet wrote a letter to Council at the end of last month, asking for the issue of allowing backyard poultry to be reconsidered. A motion was passed to reaffirm that the topic of backyard hens be dropped from Council’s Works in Progress, effectively quashing any further discussion on allowing backyard chicken coops. The North Peace SPCA is contracted by the City to impound animals at large which are rounded up by bylaw officers. Mayor Ackerman explained that the SPCA continually faces capacity issues, which it said would be exacerbated by the shelter having to take care of chickens in addition to those animals it already cares for.last_img read more