LOOK: Manny Pacquiao rings in new year with 10 rounds of mitts, roadwork

first_imgLights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Pacquiao and Roach parted ways before the Filipino’s fight against Lucas Matthysse in July of 2018 with long-time friend Buboy Fernandez, who’s been a veteran corner man for the American, becoming the fighter’s head trainer.Roach, however, is now back in the Pacquiao camp as a consultant.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissManny Pacquiao takes on the hills at Griffith Park. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOPacquiao (60-7-2) also did roadwork at Griffith Park where he drew a crowd to watch his workout. He posed for photos with fans afterward.The fight will be Pacquiao’s first title defense of the WBA belt after his technical knockout win over Matthysse in Kuala Lumpur. LATEST STORIES Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony PLAY LIST 00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View comments Manny Pacquiao works the mitts with training consultant Freddie Roach. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOMANILA, Philippines—Manny Pacquiao continued working with former head trainer Freddie Roach as he prepares to defend his WBA World welterweight title against Adrien Broner.Roach worked the mitts with Pacquiao for 10 rounds on Monday (Los Angeles time) at Wild Card Gym, the Filipino’s former stomping grounds where he built his legacy as an all-time great.ADVERTISEMENT Pacers’ Myles Turner breaks nose in win over Hawks Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plumcenter_img No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college MOST READ After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Picnic for 1950s SP High grads set Sunday

first_imgRobberstad was diagnosed with cancer in March of 2000, but kept planning along with his friends and wife, Marti. Many friends and volunteers assisted with publicity, park permits, food and decorations. Robberstad died in May of 2000, four months before the first picnic was scheduled. Almost 400 people attended the event in September, Mardesich said. “Old friends separated by years and miles got caught up on each others’ lives,” she recalled, adding that they decided to make it an annual event. She encourages her fellow 1950s graduates to attend the event and to catch up, partly “in honor of Pete’s vision.” By Rachel Jones STAFF WRITER Sunday, a decade of San Pedro High School graduates will gather at Point Fermin Park for a large reunion picnic. Anyone who graduated in the 1950s is welcome to attend the free all-day event. “It is really fun to see old friends, to be able to say hi, talk to them and find out what they have been doing for these last 40-plus years,” said MaryAnn Mardesich, who graduated in 1959. According to Mardesich, the picnic tradition was the brainchild of classmate Pete Robberstad, who first started working on it in 1998. rachel.jones@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Shock midfielder exit at Arsenal, Chelsea target Valencia starlet, and more transfer rumours…

first_imgHere’s the top transfer-related stories in Saturday’s newspapers…Arsenal midfielder Mesut Ozil, 26, will receive a “serious” offer from Turkish side Fenerbahce, according to the player’s agent. (Takvim via Independent) Everton could make a move for 23-year-old Empoli forward Riccardo Saponara in January. (Daily Star) Porto are closing in on a move for 27-year-old Argentina midfielder Ricky Alvarez, who is on loan at Sunderland from Inter Milan. (Sunderland Echo) Chelsea have stepped up their interest in Valencia defender Jose Luis Gaya, 20, and are considering paying his release clause. (Metro)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…Liverpool:Liverpool boost! Mamadou Sakho signs new long-term contract with clubOn-loan Liverpool misfit Mario Balotelli will be a ‘hero’ at AC Milan, claims team-mate Ignazio AbateManchester United:Ander Herrera tells talkSPORT he is ‘proud’ of Manchester United teammate Luke Shaw – but admits he could not bear to look at his injuryReal Madrid goalkeeper Keylor Navas to be handed new contract after Man United move collapsed Others:Zlatan Ibrahimovic books Malmo city square for fans to watch PSG Champions League matchCrystal Palace received no summer offers from Spurs for Yannick Bolasie, reveals Alan PardewSlaven Bilic: ‘Really class’ players like Dimitri Payet don’t need time to adapt to the Premier LeagueMarseille make move for Emmanuel Adebayor after Tottenham exit Transfer rumours and paper review 1last_img read more

MAN WHO RAPED PARTNER IN FRONT OF CHILD JAILED FOR SIX YEARS

first_imgA 25 year old Donegal man who raped his ex-partner in front of their infant child has been sentenced to six years in prison.The man, who cannot be named, pleaded guilty at the Central Criminal Court to rape of the woman at his home on February 26, 2010. Judge Garrett Sheehan said he had taken into account the nature of the offence and the “courageous and hopeful note on which the woman concluded her victim impact report.”The man is now in a new relationship and is expecting a child with his partner who seems to be having an extremely positive influence on him.Mr Justice Sheehan said he had taken into account the man’s plea of guilty, his remorse and apology.He said his personal involvement with his daughter’s upbringing, prior to the offence, was commendable and added that being registered a sex offender is a vey real punishment which will impact on his life once he is out of prison.He suspended the final two years of the sentence but added that the man “still has a way to go to really understand the impact this offence has had on his first family”.The man and the victim lived together and had a child before they separated in 2009.They took turns to mind the child and on the day of the attack the woman was leaving it with her partner at his home. They both washed and played with the child before putting her to bed in her cot.The man then attacked his ex-partner and held her on the bed. He tried to rape her several times before succeeding while the baby was in the room.During the rape, the victim was shouting to stop and he threatened to tie her to the bed. Afterwards he refused to return the child to her and threatened her with revenge if she went to gardai. She promised not to and he let her go.When the victim got home her mother noticed she was pale and asked what was wrong.The woman said she had been raped and gardai were called. He was arrested and denied having any sexual contact with the woman. DNA evidence was later found linking him to the rape.Defence counsel, Mr John Whelan SC, said his client “misread the situation” and had the impression the sex was consensual. He said he stopped once he realised the woman wasn‘t consenting.Mr Whelan called it a “once-off, spur of the moment incident” and said the man pleaded guilty to spare his partner the ordeal of trial.He said the man is of ‘limited intelligence’ and fell into drugs after dropping out of school.MAN WHO RAPED PARTNER IN FRONT OF CHILD JAILED FOR SIX YEARS was last modified: November 16th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

UNIQUE COACHING INITIATIVE TO SPREAD WORK OF THE GAA

first_imgA unique coaching initiative is hoping to spread the word of the GAA in communities not normally associated with the association. The programme, which will be undertaken by Letterkenny’s St Eunan’s, hopes to employ four coaches to work with children from non-traditional GAA backgrounds in an area from Cresslough to Newtowncunningham.The club have been enabled to start the programme thanks to funding from Donegal County Development Board’s Peace and Reconciliation Partnership.The coaches will go to schools and clubs to encourage young people who have never tried playing Gaelic games to get involved.Funded under the PEACE III Programme, it will also host workshops in areas of culture, nutrition and community building topics. Further details on the work of the programme are available on www.donegalcdb.ie/peaceiii Speaking at the announcement JoAnne Kilmartin, Project Development Officer with the Peace and Reconciliation Partnership said they were delighted to support this initiative.“It is great to see young people from all parts of our community coming together through sport. We look forward to seeing more and more people from different backgrounds getting involved in sport,” said Ms Kilmartin.The initiative is set to start in August with 4 coaches being appointed for a period of 11 months. They will work with schools and clubs in the catchment area serving the secondary schools in Letterkenny.This means that schools in Cresslough, Termon, Glenswilly and Newtowncunningham can benefit from the coaching programme at no cost. This will encourage young people to try football or hurling and see if it is for them.Club Chairman Paul Carr commented ‘I have been involved in sport since I was a child and see the huge benefit it has brought to me personally and to our local community.“This programme will allow us to get more people involved and to challenge the traditional thinking that GAA is for some people only. I am really excited about the courses that will be run and confident that it will make a real difference for individual children and also achieve a more integrated society’.Further details of this initiative can be seen on the website www.steunansgaa.com. UNIQUE COACHING INITIATIVE TO SPREAD WORK OF THE GAA was last modified: June 21st, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal County Development BoardGAASt Eunanslast_img read more

Takeaways: Giants’ rookies make an impact in MLB debuts

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — The Giants have some banged up players right now. Alex Dickerson’s back is bothering him. Brandon Belt’s knee isn’t fully healthy. Others have the type of aches and pains usually associated with suiting up nearly every day for close to four months.It all feels better after a win, though. And after their third extra-inning victory in four days Sunday, this one courtesy of Mike Yastrzemski’s solo home run in the bottom of the 12th inning, the Giants remain 2 1/2 games back of the …last_img

Things in Space that Shouldn’t Be

first_imgA history of astronomy and a history of surprise discoveries in space would track pretty well.  Recent stories show that the trend continues even today.Wet moon:  The moon was thought to be depleted of volatiles – until now.  According to PhysOrg, “Researchers discover water on the moon is widespread, similar to Earth’s.”  Shouldn’t all this have been known since the Apollo astronauts brought back rocks from the moon?  Well, researchers at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville have re-analyzed some samples and are “once again turning what scientists thought they knew about the moon on its head,” the article exclaimed.    They don’t mean they found lakes and oceans there (despite the Latin root for Mare, ocean).  Instead, they detected molecular water elements or “lunar dew” in apatite similar to amounts in Earth basalts.  Their paper, published in Nature,1 said, “Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks.”    What does this mean?  “One possible implication,” the abstract stated, “is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought.”  And if volatiles are rich, the leading theory for the moon’s formation becomes poor.  PhysOrg explained:The finding of volatiles on the moon has deep implications for how it, and the Earth, formed.  It is generally believed that the moon was created when the early Earth was hit by a Mars-sized proto-planet called Theia, melting and vaporizing itself and a large chunk of the Earth.  The cloud of particles created by the impact later congealed to form the moon, which supposedly was devoid of highly volatile elements such as hydrogen and chlorine.  However, the researchers’ discovery of these volatiles challenges this theory.    “If water in the Moon was residue water kept during the giant impact, it is surprising that water survived the impact at all because less volatile elements, such as sodium and potassium, are strongly depleted.  The details of the impact theory need to be re-examined,’ [Yang] Liu [U Tennessee] said.Theia appears poised to join Nemesis in the arsenal of imaginary terrorists (see 07/21/2010).Mercurial sleeper awakes:  “Every time we’ve encountered Mercury, we’ve discovered new phenomena.”  That’s PhysOrg quoting says MESSENGER principal investigator Sean Solomon [Carnegie Institution].  “We’re learning that Mercury is an extremely dynamic planet, and it has been so throughout its history.”    That’s a very different picture than a few years ago, when Mercury was supposed to be a dead world, long ago frozen into silence.  Solomon was remarking about Mercury’s young volcanism, magnetic substorms and ionic emissions from its thin atmosphere, discovered during two previous flybys.  The spacecraft will go into orbit around Mercury next March: “we’ll be in for a terrific show,” remarked Solomon.    See the pictures on BBC News about the youngest volcano found on Mercury so far.  Science Daily surveyed the most surprising finds, and National Geographic News focused on huge “curious” power surges detected in the planet’s atmosphere.  “There’re some things here we clearly do not understand,” said one scientist.Quakers in space:  Ever heard of spacequakes?  Those are impacts of plasma blobs from the sun on the Earth’s magnetic field.  Big ones can push the field all the way down to Earth’s surface, Space.com said, then they bounce like a tennis ball with decreasing amplitude.  The THEMIS spacecraft “discovered something new and surprising” in this “long suspected” phenomenon, the article said: “The surprise is plasma vortices, huge whirls of magnetized gas as wide as Earth itself, spinning on the verge of the quaking magnetic field.”    There are other quakers that have been discovered in space, too.  “Spacequakes aren’t the only unearthly temblors around,” Space.com said.  “Scientists have also discovered starquakes (violent trembling inside stars), moonquakes and asteroid quakes (seismic tremors on the surface of the moon and asteroids, respectively).”  Whole lot of shaking going on out there.Rings and hexagons:  Scientists from the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn shared a 6th anniversary CHARM teleconference this week (Cassini-Huygens Analysis and Results from the Mission).  Two Powerpoint presentations about the rings and atmosphere are available for download in PDF form (audio files may be posted later on).  An account of the number of surprises and phenomena not understood in the 100+ slides is left as an exercise; as teasers, they admitted that the B-ring edge is more dynamic and complex than can be understood (ditto for the F-ring), the rings may be much younger than Saturn, and the hexagon-shaped cloud pattern at Saturn’s north pole can only partially be modeled in the lab (audio is needed for full discussion).Super star:  According to theory, stars can only grow to about 150 times the mass of the sun, partly because they would burn out too quickly to be seen, partly because the winds would tear them apart, and partly because there is not enough gas and dust in most locales to gravitationally contract into a star much bigger than 150 solar masses.    Doubters, behold R136a1: a blue giant almost twice the theoretical size limit.  It is currently 265 times the sun’s mass, but astronomers estimate at birth it was a whopping 320 solar masses.  And talk about sunburn: its luminosity has been estimated at 10 million times brighter than our sun.  The BBC News said its radius is 30 times greater than our sun.  A diagram on National Geographic News illustrates the size difference.    Science Daily described the puzzle of this star: “Understanding how high mass stars form is puzzling enough, due to their very short lives and powerful winds, so that the identification of such extreme cases as R136a1 raises the challenge to theorists still further.”  Was it born big, or did it collect smaller stars into its household?  Astronomers were “really taken aback” by the discovery, National Geographic said, adding: “The discovery could rewrite the laws of stellar physics, since it’s long been thought that stars beyond a certain mass would be too unstable to survive.”The big burst:  Gamma ray bursts have been known since 1967, but an “extraordinary” one detected on June 21 was off the charts.  National Geographic News said that “Until now, scientists thought the brightest gamma-ray bursts sent out a maximum of 10,000 x-ray photons a second.”  Here’s the measured flux from this one: “145,000 photons a second… making this gamma-ray burst 10 to 15 times brighter than anything previously seen by Swift’s x-ray telescope.  It was so bright it “blinded” the Swift orbiting space telescope temporarily, saturating its detectors: the “rush of light from a minute-long gamma-ray burst proved so overwhelming that Swift’s data processing software temporarily shut down.”    Swift normally catches light from about two gamma ray bursts per week.  Space.com said this super-bright one is stirring theories: “Just when we were beginning to think that we had seen everything that gamma-ray bursts could throw at us, this burst came along to challenge our assumptions about how powerful their X-ray emissions can be,” said Neil Gehrels, principal investigator for Swift.    A new mission named Xenia is being planned to watch for these cosmic beacons.  “The newfound burst, he said, means that Xenia mission designers will have to go back to the drawing board to make sure the probe will be able to handle the brightest flashes the universe can dish out.”  And speaking of explosions, Science Daily reported earlier this month that among the best-understood ones, Type 1a supernovae, the “Origin of Key Cosmic Explosions [Is] Still a Mystery.”There’s no indication that the number of surprising discoveries will decrease over the next few years.  Quite the contrary; an article on PhysOrg about early results from the Herschel Space Observatory with its SPIRE camera quoted Ian Smail of Durham University, who analyzes results from the mission: “It is already clear that we live in a changing Universe and, thanks to Herschel and SPIRE, few things are changing faster than our perception of it.”    Looking back over 400 years of astronomy since Galileo and Kepler, Joseph Burns of Cornell University surveyed the many surprising discoveries made in space, especially in the last 5 decades of the space program: the Van Allen belts; Venus’s young surface; old, cold moons that proved surprisingly active; old, cold comets that showed evidence of hot formation; asteroids thought to be hard rock that turn out to be rubble piles; remarkable dynamism in Saturn’s rings; chaotic motions of moons; and more.  “Few scientists envisaged that the neighbouring worlds explored by space missions would be so diverse, nor how entrancing many are.”  Publishing his account in Nature,2 (see also summary on Space.com), using the word “surprising” a number of times, he quoted a character from Tom Stoppard’s novel Arcadia in his conclusion talking about scientific revolutions: “It’s the best possible time to be alive, when almost everything you thought you knew is wrong.”1.  Boyce, Liu et al, “Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances,” Nature 466, pp 466�469, 2 July 2010, doi:10.1038/nature09274.2.  Joseph Burns, “The four hundred years of planetary science since Galileo and Kepler,” Nature 466, pp 575�584, 29 July 2010, doi:10.1038/nature09215.If some scientists want to celebrate their ignorance, some of us will be happy to supply the conical hats and party blowers.  To Joe’s list we can add many more surprises that, within the living memory of many of us, hit the astronomers broadside: quasars, pulsars, blazars, gamma-ray bursts, the cosmic microwave background radiation (partly predicted, but not to the expected values; see 06/12/2008), mature galaxies at the farthest distances (04/02/2009), gravitational lenses (partly predicted), silence from SETI, transient lunar phenomena, Io’s volcanoes, the Enceladus geysers, the inhospitable surfaces of Venus and Mars (civilizations were expected there into the 1960s), Ganymede’s magnetic field, the Kuiper belt, minor planets beyond Pluto, the lack of organics and carbonates (and life) on Mars, the tilted magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune, the rings of Jupiter and Uranus and Neptune, the F-ring of Saturn, the geysers of Triton, binary asteroids… where could we stop?  It’s hard to find any object in space that closely matched what astronomers expected.  While we share the thrill of surprising discoveries with the astronomers, we should not treat them as prophets.  They have a lot of whiz at math (01/08/2010) and access to great equipment (12/08/2009), but are as fallible as the rest of us – though occasionally, the luck of discovery comes to the prepared minds.    Astronomy proceeds along two tracks: the theory track, and the data track.  Physicists at chalkboards derive equations that predict what might be found or try to explain what is found (03/28/2010, 01/20/2010, 01/13/2010).  Observational astronomers gather the raw data with telescopes.  Sometimes these tracks intersect.  Sometimes one precedes the other.  One might expect that observation would lead theory, trying to make sense of new observations.  Often, though, theory leads to discoveries.  Theory can even determine what observations get made, and what an astronomer “sees” with the senses – as when today’s astronomers pursue their mad quest (08/03/2009) for dark matter (02/28/2008) and dark energy (07/17/2010, 10/08/2009).  If the observations in the past 5 decades have been surprising, the theories have been even more so (06/30/2008): inflation (02/24/2009, 04/18/2008), black holes with universes inside them (04/10/2010), parallel universes, and the multiverse (02/22/2010, 12/05/2008).  While one would hope observations would constrain theory (08/26/2009), some of the latest theoretical speculations seem like acts of desperation to maintain beliefs in spite of the observations (03/19/2010, 10/28/2009, 09/28/2009, 11/17/2008; cf. 10/29/2007).    We’re all together for the ride on our planetary spaceship.  We have been given a phenomenal platform for scientific discovery (watch The Privileged Planet on YouTube).  Fallible as we all are, it should not be surprising to be surprised by what we find, as we peer farther into the unknown with better instruments.  What is surprising is for any of us to grant prophetic powers (both in terms of prediction and understanding) to a class of fellow mortals (06/23/2009, 10/16/2008), just because they label themselves scientists (03/10/2010, 01/15/2008).  The spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets.  As new data comes rolling in from Kepler, MESSENGER, Herschel, Planck and future missions, let’s keep the marketplace open and a lively place for debate and critical thinking.(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Suicide is not painless if you’re the one left behind

first_imgHelen Walne, author of ‘The Diving’, which explores her brother Richard’s suicide. Photo: Ben Williams/BooksLive By Lorraine Kearney9 June 2014The Book Lounge in Roeland Street is a favourite haunt of Cape Town’s literati. Besides selling some of the more interesting books and better novels, it hosts weekly storytelling sessions for the young ‘uns and fabulous book launches.And so it came to pass that one sunny evening in the dying days of summer, a motley crew gathered among the books, after quaffing wine and snacking on delicious canapés in the basement. In front of us sat writer Helen Walne, serene and shining, talking about one of the last great taboos: suicide.Walne’s book, The Diving, is a wrenching, sometimes brutal, often funny, always beautiful memoire of her brother’s suicide. Richard Walne was a musician, singer, songwriter and poet. He was highly regarded – so much so that in Durban, a street has been renamed after him. You can now saunter down Richard Walne Road, next to Maydon Wharf Channel. It used to be called Canal Road, and it has a length of 0.8 kilometres.But at the age of 39, Richard walked into the cold Cape Town sea one day and did not return. Suicide always brings endless questions, heartbreak and guilt: why did he do it? Was I not enough to make him want to live? Did I not do enough to save him?Being a writer, after Richard died, Helen, who is a friend and colleague of mine, says she “went to the literature” – but came up empty-handed. There were no books to explain it; just as no one talked about suicide, no one wrote about it – from a personal perspective – either. Suicide is not supposed to happen. Our desire to live is supposed to trump the urge to top ourselves. It is so slippery a topic, so difficult to comprehend, that religions forbid it and deny that people who commit suicide get into heaven. In some countries, suicide is even illegal.Walne is best known for her humour. She is a funny gal, and her regular columns either have readers in stitches or apoplectic rages, so The Diving is not at all what you would expect. It is a deeply moving, utterly beautiful book. It doesn’t explain suicide (as she says, she cannot speak for Richard), but it unpacks her healing. And in that it may just show a way for someone else to find some hope, too.Visit Helen Walne’s website: www.helenwalne.co.za or follow her on Twitter: @helen_walnelast_img read more

HootSuite Mobile Gets Ads with 140 Proof

first_imgmike melanson Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationcenter_img The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#advertising#twitter#web While the blogosphere has been buzzing over how and when Twitter will finally roll out the full details of its anticipated ad platform, 140 Proof has put together an advertising platform for the microblog service of its own. Today, it announced that it will integrate targeted advertising for HootSuite on both Android and iPhone.HootSuite is launching an Android version of its Twitter client today, along with a new version for the iPhone, both of which will have ads by 140 Proof. While this certainly may not be the most exciting news around to Twitter users (has anyone ever said “Boy, this would be great, if only it had some advertising!”), companies looking to reach Twitter’s userbase have a way for targeting their ads.From what we heard last week about Twitter’s expected ad platform, 140 Proof takes a similar approach. According to the company’s press release, “the ads behave just like tweets: each ad must have a real tweet associated with it so users can reply, and if desired, retweet the ad.”A big difference here, however, is that the expected Twitter ad platform would only appear in searches. The 140 Proof ad platform, on the other hand, is highly targeted, focusing on a number of features, such as “keywords in tweets, followers, as well as device, location and platform”, according to TechCrunch. The ads will show up directly in the user’s tweet stream, but will be easily identifiable.last_img read more

From Chaos to Community

first_imgIt’s that time of year again – the start of a new school year. For many young children, this may be the first time they’ve been in group care. In the life of a young child, that’s a BIG deal!Remembering my years teaching preschool, those first few days were packed with feelings – scared, excited, lonely, delighted, confused, curious, tired, more excited…and that was just me! Seriously, it’s always a wild mess of highs and lows for children those first few days.Although entering a new child care environment is a chaotic, challenging experience for all young children, for children of military families it may be just one of many unfamiliar situations. These children have often experienced a lot of changes, especially if the family has recently relocated. Imagine what it would be like to not only have a new child care setting, but also a new house, a new neighborhood, a new place of worship, a new park…and the list goes on. As a child’s new teacher or caregiver, you have a unique and critical role to play in helping him or her to begin to adjust to a new place with new people.Create Predictability: One of the best ways you can help children adjust to their new “school” is to establish some order in the chaos – to begin some routines and regular practices that will soon become familiar to the children. Although it’s easy to think that variety will be more interesting to the children, the truth is that, at least at first, boring (i.e., predictable) is best. Children, from young babies to kindergartners, will feel much more relaxed when they know what to expect. And more relaxed, happy children will listen better, get along better, and learn better.Create Community: But even more important to young children’s adjustment to school is to create an environment where they feel like they belong. Creating a place where new children feel safe (both physically and emotionally), cared for, listened to, valued and enjoyed is, in my opinion, the most important goal a teacher can strive for. Creating a strong sense of community in a program will take time but there are many things you can do to start off on the right path. Here are my “top four:”Visually represent your classroom community.  In as many ways as you can think of, show children that each of them is part of the larger group. For example, post displays of the children’s names and/or photos all together under the name of the class/group at children’s eye level. Every way you can, give the children visual evidence that they belong.Focus on names. For young children, names are a central aspect of their self-identify. It’s often the first word they learn to read and to write. Use that information to help each child feel valuable and unique AND to help them get to know one another by playing name games, writing their names down often, using name labels to identify places to sit or works of art, etc. And don’t forget to remind them of your own name often, especially during the first couple of days. You are the most important person in the classroom for them to build a connection with; that connection starts with knowing your name.Help children connect. Give children lots of opportunities to connect one-on-one with each other. A whole group of new faces is overwhelming for any age of child (or adult, for that matter!). But one new face at a time is manageable for most. Subtly suggest playmates during free play time, especially for those who are a little slower to warm up. Pair children up throughout the day for short bits of time: walking to the playground, sitting together at snack, doing an art or building activity, or doing movement or music activities. Although in general it’s best to let children pick their own play partners, during this time when everyone’s a stranger, it can be helpful to give them opportunities to get to know each other one at a time.Those are just a few of my suggestions for helping children quickly feel a part of a new group. But I’d also love to hear from you! What strategies do YOU use to develop a sense of belonging and community in your program? Please share your thoughts in a comment.If you want more on this topic, here are some resources I suggest. Feel free to share others.Tips for Parent to Handle Separation Anxiety When Leaving Your Child in Child Care Using Social Stories to Ease TransitionsHelp Children Get to Know Each OtherPlease visit our Facebook page for even more related resources! Kathy Reschkelast_img read more