Manchester United target nets stunning free-kick for title winners (Video)

first_img1 Manchester United’s defeat to Chelsea proves they still need to add some quality to their side if they want to mount a serious Premier League title challenge next year.Louis van Gaal has already been identifying his transfer targets for the summer and it’s extremely likely, according to reports, Dutch international star Memphis Depay features high up on his list.And if his 20 goals in 27 games weren’t enough to tempt the Red Devils into a bid, this stunning free-kick against Heerenveen on Saturday, which seals PSV Eindhoven’s 22nd Erefdivisie title triumph.You can see the goal below… PSV Eindhoven star Memphis Depay and his team-mates celebrate last_img

CATHAL MacSUIBHNE’S GAA DIARY: WHY FINALS ARE RARELY EASILY WON

first_img“The day of destiny for Donegal arrives tomorrow; the greatest day in our GAA history with both minor and senior teams contesting All-Ireland Finals. “It still takes a bit of getting used to, it is a phenomenal achievement for the county; but achievements are one thing – at the business end of the season, silverware is what it’s all about.“Such was the dominant, swashbuckling display Jim’s troops delivered against Dublin in the semi final, that it seems a mere formality of beating a team with lesser capabilities. Finals, however, are rarely easily won; even after Donegal’s incredible start to the 2012 final they still had to fight hard in the second half for their ultimate reward. “Indeed that game may play a role this Sunday; while Jim and the players generally don’t look back at the past too much, McGuinness is on record as saying that he felt his players deviated from the plan against Mayo two years ago – he will not want a repeat this time around. The Dublin match was a lesson in patience and in knowing that what has been laid out for them pre-match by the management team will lead them to victory if executed correctly.“Kerry are a lesser team than Dublin but one key difference is that they have a much more competent and tactically aware manager. Eamon Fitzmaurice is a shrewd operator and him and his team deserve respect. Donegal’s big advantage on Sunday is that they know their game plan and will not change; therefore the onus is on Kerry to rise to the challenge and come up with something that could unlock the door. The problem is that many teams have tried but most have failed.“Two things need to happen for Kerry to win – firstly Donegal have to underperform and secondly Kerry have to dig their trenches and get down and dirty. They have to try to repeat what Armagh almost did in August and what Monaghan did last year, beat Donegal at their own game.Michael Murphy and Rory Kavanagh will have a big say in Sunday’s game.“Easier said than done of course – Kerry don’t play as sophisticated a defensive system as Donegal. While they have become better under Fitzmaurice at bringing bodies back and moving from defence to attack quickly, they are not in Donegal’s league at this aspect of play. Four weeks of work leading up to the final doesn’t match up to four years of system and skills repetition under McGuinness. “I attended a wedding in Kerry last week and as usual with the Kingdom, they’re not short on confidence. While most supporters are surprised to see their team in the final, it doesn’t mean they expect anything other than a win. History and tradition counts for a lot down south but it doesn’t matter a thing to Jim and his men. They’ve torn up the script over the past few years, they’ve abolished the notion that the superpowers are untouchable and they’ve taken their place at the top table as if it is their right.“Ryan McHugh’s stunning display last time out will mean that he comes in for close attention and he may well be man-marked. If he is, he could act as a decoy because with so much attention on him it will leave room for the likes of Leo McLoone, Odhran MacNiallais and Christy Toye. Toye will likely get the nod to start and while Patrick McBrearty may well be named on the first fifteen his impact role sub might be utilised again as it was to such devastating effect in the Ulster Final and in the last four encounter with the Dubs.“Paul Durcan will again be a key figure with Kerry loading midfield to try and disrupt his service to Neil Gallagher and on occasion Michael Murphy. The way Kerry use their centre forward, Johnny Buckley, though may cause problems for themselves. Buckley generally drops to midfield and plays as part of a three across the middle with Anthony Maher and David Moran. If he does this on Sunday, he will leave a Donegal man spare to attack from deep – music to the ears of Frank McGlynn or Anthony Thompson. Karl Lacey meanwhile will possibly be assigned marking duties on Declan O’Sullivan should the veteran take to the field.“At the Donegal Daily preview night during the week, Mickey Harte commented on how Dublin thought they had cracked the code with their long range shooting but once this thought manifested itself in their minds the game went away from them. The question is can the code be cracked at all?“Regardless of what Kerry do, or any other team for that matter, if Donegal perform to their maximum or anywhere near it, they win. That leads to its own pressures but McGuinness is a master at having his players in the right frame of mind and for that reason Donegal are favourites on Sunday and rightly so. “It is going to be a hugely emotional and special day for everyone privileged to be there and for the thousands more watching or listening at home or abroad. All we can ask of our boys is to give it their all and we’ll be proud of them. They owe us nothing – but we’ll take a second All Ireland in three years all the same!“Best of luck to both squads – we’re all with you, we’re all behind you. Ádh mór lads.CATHAL MacSUIBHNE’S GAA DIARY: WHY FINALS ARE RARELY EASILY WON was last modified: September 21st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Cathal MacSuibhnedonegalGAA diarylast_img read more

Ice-cream days raise a sweet €250,000 for Down Syndrome Ireland

first_imgIce-cream lovers across Donegal have helped bring this year’s HB Fundays total to over €250,000.More than 250 families of babies and young children with Down syndrome have been directly supported thanks to funds raised as part of this year’s HB Fundays campaign with HB Ice-cream, Down Syndrome Ireland has announced.Some €251,648 was raised as part of this year’s campaign, with many of the ice-cream parties held in schools, workplaces and community centres around Donegal. The funds raised has allowed the charity to accelerate funding for the roll out of a vital language development programme for young children with Down syndrome called See and Learn and Parent-Link, a local support service for new parents of babies with Down syndrome, provided by parent volunteers who will be trained and supported by Down Syndrome Ireland.HB Fundays 2019 ambassador, Rachel Allen with Siún Lundberg (5), from Donabate enjoying delicious HB Hazelbrook Farm ice cream in Tigers Childcare, Blanchardstown at the launch of the 2019 HB Fundays campaign in aid of Down Syndrome Ireland (DSI). Photo: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall IrelandSpeaking about the 2019 Fundays campaign, Down Syndrome Ireland CEO Gary Owens said: “We are so grateful to all the ice cream lovers out there who held a HB Fundays party this year – you are helping young children with Down syndrome develop vital speech and language skills and also helping new parents receive the support they need directly from other parents who are sharing the same journey. Thank you.” Ice-cream days raise a sweet €250,000 for Down Syndrome Ireland was last modified: October 27th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Plant Email System Described

first_imgWhat do you call a long-distance signaling system that involves coded information?Japanese researchers identified a coded string of information that acts as a signal, but it wasn’t intercepted email: it was a molecule inside a plant, the humble lab plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Phys.org says that scientists at Nagoya University identified a polypeptide that tells roots when the top of the plant is starved for nitrogen, essentially telling the roots to send some up pronto.The polypeptide is not a random string of amino acids. It’s an ordered sequence that must be recognized by the plant to generate a purposeful response. The article shows that this is a two-way communication pathway, something like email with a molecular message:Although not able to actively forage for their food, plants can nevertheless overcome problems relating to nutrient scarcity or varied distribution using a long-distance signaling mechanism. This helps determine their competitive success and productivity. For instance, nitrogen (usually in the form of nitrate) is essential for plant growth, but is often only present as patches in the soil. Nitrogen-starved roots express a mobile plant hormone (CEP) that travels upward to the shoot and eventually triggers compensatory nitrogen uptake by roots in more nitrogen-rich areas. This CEP signal is received by a receptor protein in the leaves, but the molecules involved in the shoot-to-root response signal were unknown.That’s just the first signal, from root to shoot. When the leaves in the shoot receive the signal, they switch on genes that are only activated in the shoot. To complete the communication circuit, the message needs to get back down to the root. Expecting to find one, they intercepted the message:The team showed that these polypeptides accumulated in the roots, although the genes encoding them were expressed only in the shoots. This indicated that the polypeptides act as mobile descending shoot-to-root signals.Rounding out the comparison to an email system, the article shows that this is no simple thing:Such a sophisticated signaling system ensures that plants maximize the efficiency at which they obtain nutrients, and could be exploited to improve fertilizer application and enhance plant productivity.Well, what do you know! Plants have an intranet, and they communicate with email. That should cause some interesting conversation at the water cooler. You don’t need to email your office plants, though; they speak a different language.Update 4/08/17: A paper in Nature Scientific Reports examines the “synergistic response” between roots and leaves in drought conditions. The authors speak of signals, crosstalk and feedback loops that keep all parts of the plant in touch with each other.When subjected to drought, leaves were more sensitive than roots and seedling morphology changed significantly. Some physiological changes were irreversible if the drought period exceeded 24 h. Energy and protein metabolism are stimulated in roots responding to drought stress but inhibited in leaves. Drought significantly inhibits photosynthesis in leaves. In both roots and leaves, 14-3-3-like protein A played a key role in the synergistic response to drought stress defined by our PPI network analysis. The key to understanding the signal transduction processes involved in the response to drought stress may be found in the crosstalk pathways that connect roots and leaves under these conditions. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms plants adaptation to tolerate drought stress.They ran experiments on a member of the grass family. Think about what’s going on under your feet when you walk on the lawn. To the blades of grass, it might be like an EMP attack on their communications network, but apparently, they have good recovery systems in place.We first reported the possibility of “plant email” in the early days of CEH (7/13/01), and have not lost fascination with it. This story shows that the concept is still proving fruitful in advancing scientific knowledge. Notice that a string of amino acids is meaningless without an interpreter, and that genes at both ends of the plant have to understand the language convention. The system is irreducibly complex because all the sophisticated parts must exist simultaneously for there to be any function at all. Communication systems in living things bear the hallmarks of intelligent design – that is, to all who have not been brainwashed into supposing that “stuff happens” qualifies as a scientific explanation. (Visited 104 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Photo library: Business and industry 3

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Business & Industry contact sheet (1.8MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Keneuwe Monakale tests water quality at the pre-brew plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Cleaning the filtration plate area at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Cleaning the filtration plate area at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The brewhouse at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: The bottling and labelling section at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, the brewery produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff.Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Robertson Hlatshwyo works in the labelling plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 3: {loadposition business}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library?Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

The Army’s Net Zero Energy Mission

first_imgOn August 1, the U.S. Army public affairs office in Hawaii published a feature story about the service’s new conservation initiative, which is aimed at preserving natural resources and making energy efficiency key to strategies for housing construction and improvements in transportation and general operations.“One thing that I admire about the Army is that we are full of extremely creative individuals,” Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for installations, energy and environment, told the press officer at U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii last month.In many cases, the Army will rely on the ingenuity and know-how of its soldiers to develop and deploy conservation strategies, although some of the more complex and large-scale energy saving initiatives will involve military and civilian experts. Among the most high-profile of these will be the U.S. Military Academy at West Point “Net Zero Installation” project – a series of facility upgrades that will include the installation of renewable-energy systems, advanced lighting and power monitoring systems, barracks upgrades, a biomass system, and the construction of a new barracks to net-zero-energy performance standards.An airtightness requirementArmy standards for airtightness, as adopted a few years ago by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are already very high for both renovations and new construction. The Army Corps’ HVAC commissioning procedures include air-barrier testing that show building envelope leakage rates of no more than 0.25 cubic feet per minute per square foot of building envelope, when tested at 75 Pascals. This is no small challenge. As noted in “Controlling Air Leakage in Tall Buildings,” an article published in 2009 by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, the Army is getting a lot of practice at identifying potential air-barrier deficiencies in building shells at the “pre-design” stage of a project, which allows the design-build team to address the issues and meet the leakage-rate requirement in a timely and cost-effective way.The need is thereIt won’t be cheap, but it is a good time to act because many of the barracks at the fortress-like academy are overcrowded, and the campus, perched high above the west bank of the Hudson River, near Highland Falls, New York, is exposed to extreme weather during the winter. Construction of the new barracks – the first built on the campus since 1972 – is scheduled to begin in 2013, and will cost about $131 million.Initial investment in West Point’s barracks project is coming from energy-saving specialist Noresco, which so far has awarded the school $25 million in Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) – partnerships between energy service companies and federal agencies. Supervised through the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program, the partnerships allow energy service companies such as Noresco to conduct comprehensive energy audits for a federal facility, identify improvements to save energy, design and construct a project that meets the agency’s needs, and arrange the necessary funding.One advantage to ESPCs, the DOE notes, is that they allow federal agencies to move forward on energy saving projects without committing large amounts of their own capital upfront, and without special congressional appropriations. The energy service company’s obligations are extensive, however, since it must guarantee that the improvements will generate enough energy cost savings to pay for the project over the term of the partnership contract. Contract terms up to 25 years are allowed, and additional cost savings after the contract ends accrue to the federal agency.last_img read more

What Start-Ups Need to Know About Protecting Intellectual Property Around the World

first_imgRelated Posts How OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culture China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who … What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Tags:#international#start center_img jeffrey shieh How to Get Started in China and Have Success Intellectual Property (IP) is vitally important to start-ups. The Start-Up Genome Project, which aims to map, model and analyze what makes start-ups tick, identified IP as a top source of competitive advantage for start-ups. But start-ups face significant challenges in acquiring, maintaining and enforcing their intellectual property.Guest author Jeffrey Shieh is a Senior Patent Attorney at inovia, a foreign filing technology platform provider. He is responsible for counseling the company and its clients in all facets of the international patent process. Prior to joining inovia, Shieh was a patent attorney at the law firms of Cooper & Dunham LLP and Amster, Rothstein & Ebenstein LLP.We hear a lot in the news about patent wars among the tech giants – Nokia vs. Google, Apple’s lawsuits in China, and Facebook vs. Yahoo! International patent protection is clearly a key component to defensive and offensive competitive strategies within large, global organizations. But what about smaller technology players and early stage start-ups that don’t have the resources to hire full-time, international law firms? For cash-strapped start-ups, the cost to file international patents to protect their innovations is often too complex and too costly. This leaves them exposed to competition in other markets and may have a serious impact on their ability to scale long-term.What can start-ups do to protect their innovations and IP on the world stage during the four lifecycle stages identified by the Start-Up Genome Project: Discovery, validation, efficiency and scale?Discovery and ValidationThe first step is to think globally and act locally. Start-ups should begin by applying for a domestic patent. This will give them an exclusive right to their invention for a set period of time and afford them the opportunity to formulate an international patent filing plan. Because patents are country-specific and are limited to the borders of the issuing country, start-ups need to take a hard look at their financials and come up with a strategy and budget for entering select countries. They also need to keep in mind that after filing for a U.S. patent, there is a limited timeframe available for applying for international patent protection. The worst case scenario would be for a start-up to forgo international patent protection and later realize that it isn’t able to protect their its invention against infringers in other markets.So while a start-up may operate only in the U.S. today, if there’s a chance that it may somedayt manufacture in Asia, sell in Europe, or compete with a company in Australia, it must act now.EfficiencyDon’t be discouraged. There are several best practices to foreign patent strategies and obtaining broader patent protection while minimizing costs.First, start-ups should consider filing a Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application instead of filing direct via the Paris Convention. The PCT provides a unified procedure for filing into the 146 member countries and offers a more cost-effective route if filing into more than just one or two countries. The PCT also offers the advantage of time. After the PCT application is filed, the applicant has up to 18 months before filing into the individual countries where protection is sought (“national stage entry”), providing a start-up with time to refine the invention, research its markets and look for licensees or buyers.Second, start-ups should select their countries intelligently. Start-ups need to know where their inventions will potentially be sold and where they can be made in the future. Start-ups can then prioritize the countries they want to file into. Additionally, start-ups should know whether a country has patent laws affecting their technology. For example, some countries prohibit the patenting of methods of treatment on human or animal subjects. Other countries make it very difficult to patent business methods or software. For these jurisdictions, start-ups may need to draft the claims in their application specifically to overcome these obstacles.Third, start-ups must ace the patent application process. With a basic background understanding of the process, start-ups can reduce their filing costs. Knowing when deadlines are approaching and making sure to provide instructions in advance will help applicants avoid unnecessary time extensions or rush charges. Some jurisdictions (including Europe) charge excess claims fees for each claim included in an application over a certain number. If start-ups can reduce their claims, they can avoid or reduce these fees.Finally, start-ups should explore their options for either bringing IP tasks in house or outsourcing them. Depending on the amount of work a start-up has in its patent portfolio, it may be cost effective to pay the salary for an in-house patent attorney, rather than retain outside counsel. Outsourcing certain services, such as foreign filing or annuity payments, can also help reduce legal fees.Start-ups must make sure to research their options for foreign filing and run cost comparisons. Many steps of the foreign filing process, such as PCT national stage filing and European validation, are largely administrative and can easily be outsourced. Specialist foreign filing providers can often offer time and cost savings.ScaleStart-ups raise the most funds during stage 4 of their lifecycle: Scale. In this stage, start-ups try to drive growth aggressively and maximize their profits. For many, the key at this stage is their ability to grow in international markets – which could depend on their international patent protection.Even thought they may be strapped for cash, startups must think long term and protect the future of their business by securing both domestic and international patent protection. They must intelligently weigh large, known upfront costs against an unknown benefit down the road – and that’s a scary prospect. But by employing a few simple best practices, start-ups can maximize their patent protection, cut costs and future-proof their innovations.last_img read more