Phish Lyricist Tom Marshall Launches “Under The Scales” Podcast Series [Listen]

first_imgNext to many classic Phish songs is the credit (Anastasio/Marshall), a testament to the songwriting duo of Trey Anastasio and Tom Marshall. The longtime friends and musical partners have written countless tunes in the band’s repertoire, so it’s no surprise that Marshall would want to talk about said music. Fortunately for us, Marshall has started a new podcast called “Under The Scales,” where he dives deeper into the Phish culture from his unique perspective.Marshall launched the series with three episodes. The first talks about the motivation behind the podcast, the second discusses a songwriting weekend that led to some of Phish’s most prized material, and the third talks about “Riding The Rail” at shows. Check out all three episodes, with titles and Marshall’s descriptions, below.Episode #000: Let’s Take A RideMy producer, Mark Dowd, and I take a ride through Trey’s and my old grade-school, and discuss some history and motivation behind the Under the Scales podcast.Episode #001: The Songwriting WeekendIn 1997, Trey and I escaped for long weekends to write a lot of songs which eventually appeared on Phish albums and became part of Phish’s live repertoire. This is the story of one of those weekends, and how it got off to a *horrifying* start. Trey listened to this and said “it’s like the secret backstory to the song Twist” — and it really is.Episode #002: Riding the RailDerek Gregory joins me in the studio to discuss his extensive experience with Phish…he likes it up close to the band. Real close. I try to figure out the hows and whys of “riding the rail” as it’s called.We can’t wait for more Under The Scales!last_img read more

Yaya Toure wants African players to have more ambition

first_imgFour-time African Player of the Year, Yaya Toure, believes African players need to be more ambitious if they want to reach the levels of the world’s best.Few Africans have featured among the best in the world in recent times, with the Ivoirian midfield giant the sole player from the continent to feature in the 23-man FIFA Ballon d’Or shortlist for the third year running. He also remains in contention for a record-extending CAF African Player of the Year award for the fifth straight year.The 32-year-old blamed the development on what he sees as the shortsightedness of fellow Africans who tend to get distracted after a little initial success.”Africans have a tendency to slack off,” Yaya told France Football.”They are living in a world of their own. They believe they made it, they are the greatest, the strongest. But they don’t understand that there are many more hills to climb to reach the top.”Unfortunately, many only see the bright side of this job: the easy money, the girls, the parties, the big cars and the beautiful clothes. And they give up too quickly on the idea of matching the best players. Many are content with little. They send money back home and are safe for the next few years. What is the point of suffering? “I have the feeling they prohibit themselves from dreaming big with a kind of fatalistic resignation. They believe that the highest level is not for them.”–Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more