Copper collector hid behind couch

first_imgFacebook Advertisement Previous articleHolidaymakers beware of jewellery scamsNext articleLimerick to have own designated ‘graffiti’ street admin Linkedin Email Printcenter_img A MAN who said that he had been given permission to remove copper piping from a house due for demolition, hid behind a couch when gardai came on the scene, a court heard.Jonathan Curtin(21) of 13 Yeats Avenue, admitted he was removing copper piping form a house at Mountain View in O’Malley Park on January 30 last.The court heard from Inspector Paul Reidy that gardai arrived at the house to find a “large bolt cutters at the front door. Mr Curtin was hiding behind a couch”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Limerick District Court heard that Mr Curtin had 108 previous convictions, all for road traffic offences.Mr Curtin’s solicitor, John Devane, said that his client had been “working on an ad-hoc basis for the firm responsible for demolishing these houses under the Regeneration project. He had asked the builders if he could take the copper and was told he could”.Mr Devane said that Mr Curtin “was constantly getting into trouble. as a young person. with driving offences.“He has been out of trouble for some time now”.Judge Eugene O’Kelly asked why Mr Curtin was hiding behind the couch if he believed he had permission to take the copper?“Panic” Mr Devane said.Judge O’Kelly remanded him on bail for a probation report to November 8. WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsCopper collector hid behind couchBy admin – July 10, 2012 961 Twitterlast_img read more

Bill ‘forces same-sex marriages on church’ – lawyer

first_imgStuff.co.nz 28 Aug 2012Church ministers with a moral objection to gay marriage would be criminalised by refusing to wed same-sex couples if a new bill becomes law, a legal opinion states. The view of Ian Bassett on Louisa Wall’s ”marriage equality” bill, commissioned by conservative lobby group Family First, was released today. It came as a petition against the bill signed by about 50,000 people was delivered to Parliament this afternoon. The bill is expected to pass its first reading when it is debated at Parliament tomorrow. Bassett’s opinion suggests church ministers, marriage celebrants and even wedding photographers who withheld their services to same-sex couples on the grounds of a moral objection to gay marriage would be breaking the law if Wall’s bill passed. It rejects the view of the Human Rights Commission, issued late last week, which said religious ministers would still be allowed to refuse to marry anyone – including same-sex couples – if Wall’s bill passed. The Human Rights Commission statement was ”legally incorrect,” Bassett said.“If a marriage celebrant is available to exercise his or her statutory role, he or she cannot refuse to do so by reason of any prohibited ground of discrimination (ie. such as sexual orientation),” his opinion stated. The practical effect of the bill, if enacted, would be that church ministers with moral objections to same sex marriage would likely “withdraw totally from the statutory role of marriage celebrant; withdraw totally from providing religious marriage ceremonies to the public; continue providing religious marriage ceremonies only to members of his or her own church”. Also as a result of the bill, a church could not refuse to rent out its premises to its members for a same-sex wedding on the grounds of their sexuality. Church ministers with moral objections to renting out church facilities for same sex marriage functions and who wanted to ”avoid the risk of being forced to do so,” would ”likely withdraw from making their church facilities available to any member of the public, including play-groups, senior citizen or other community groups”. ”The consequences for churches and communities would be significant,” Bassett’s opinion said.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/7563277/Bill-forces-same-sex-marriages-on-church-lawyerlast_img read more