Photos: How the Warriors celebrated Halloween at Oracle Arena

first_imgThe Golden State Warriors opened up Oracle Arena early for Halloween.To mark the holiday, the team gave away 10,000 Kevin Durant bobbleheads. The Warriors also welcomed in trick-or-treaters with several locations around the venue. Representatives also handed out bags to the first 2,000 youths to help with the collection of candy.The Warriors encouraged fans to wear costumes, but they had to abide by rules, including the removal of masks before entering the arena and the ban on clubs, bats and …last_img

Cell Has Automatic Jam-Clearing Proofreading Machinery

first_imgFindings at Rockefeller University have scientists excited.  DNA copying machines work on a “sliding clamp” that can hold two repair machines at the same time.  One is a low-fidelity repair tool, the other a high-fidelity repair tool.  Usually, the high-fidelity one is active, but when it needs a bigger hammer that is perhaps more effective but less accurate, it automatically switches to the other.  Here’s how the abstract of the paper in Molecular Cell by Indiani, O’Donnell et al.1 describes it in detail:This report demonstrates that the beta sliding clamp of E. coli binds two different DNA polymerases at the same time.  One is the high-fidelity Pol III chromosomal replicase and the other is Pol IV, a low-fidelity lesion bypass Y family polymerase.  Further, polymerase switching on the primed template junction is regulated in a fashion that limits the action of the low-fidelity Pol IV.  Under conditions that cause Pol III to stall on DNA, Pol IV takes control of the primed template.  After the stall is relieved, Pol III rapidly regains control of the primed template junction from Pol IV and retains it while it is moving, becoming resistant to further Pol IV takeover events.  These polymerase dynamics within the beta toolbelt complex restrict the action of the error-prone Pol IV to only the area on DNA where it is required. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)The paper says this is like having a “toolbelt” with different tools depending on the need of the project.  Bacteria have five DNA polymerase tools; humans have more.  Pol III is like the perfectionist editor that cuts out the typos, but it can stall.  Pol IV, like the plumber with a big wrench, isn’t as picayunish about the details but knows how to get the operation flowing again.  “The findings by O’Donnell and his colleagues,” the press release explains, “show that, because both polymerases are bound simultaneously to the beta clamp, it can pull either of the polymerases out if its toolbelt as needed.”  This apparently forms an automatic switchover mechanism where Pol III has priority.  A stall either loosens the grip of Pol III, or triggers a change in the sliding clamp that lets Pol IV intervene for the brute-force repair.    A paper in Cell2 earlier this month described how multiple parts work together to fix mismatched DNA.  Since mismatched bases have serious health consequences, a suite of operations, still poorly understood, checks to detect and correct the error.  The paper by Zhang et al. describes part of the process:Evidence is provided that efficient repair of a single mismatch requires multiple molecules of MutS-alpha-MutL-alpha complex.  These data suggest a model for human mismatch repair involving coordinated initiation and termination of mismatch-provoked excision.The cover of the issue humorously highlights the problem with a picture of a guy with unmatched socks.  Mismatch in DNA is no joke, however; it can lead to cancer and genomic instability.1Indiani et al., “A Sliding-Clamp Toolbelt Binds High- and Low-Fidelity DNA Polymerases Simultaneously,” Molecular Cell, Volume 19, Issue 6, 16 September 2005, pages 805-815.2Zhang et al., “Reconstitution of 5′-Directed Human Mismatch Repair in a Purified System,” Cell, Volume 122, Issue 5, 9 September 2005, pages 693-705.How could evolution ever devise a mechanism like an automatic toolbelt?  This is uncanny.  Here is a set of molecules that are programmed to act like a multi-faceted assembly line with a built-in, automatic-switching, multipart repair kit.  Neither the press release nor either paper made any attempt to explain how Tinker Bell and her mutation wand could have produced wonders like these.  Who would dare?(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Meerut discus makers want Krishna Poonia to shine in London Olympics

first_imgKanhiya Lal Saini grips the discus in his rustic palm to show how it is held and thrown.”Once in a while, we have to test the samples and for that we are told how to grip it,” he grins before shifting focus to his job.Drilling holes to fix the centre of a discus is what Kanhiya does for a living.His knowledge of international sport though is limited to Krishna Poonia, the Commonwealth Games gold medal winner, who often visits the manufacturing unit of Anand Track and Field Equipment, from where the star player gets the discus customised.”She is very finicky about the equipment. She prefers more weight on the rim. Even before going to London she visited the factory along with her husband and spent some time with us. We hope she returns with a medal from London,” says Rajendra Kumar, who has been working in the field for 16 years.There is no bigger satisfaction for these workers than seeing their products hurled to a distance and fetching star players medals.”We feel rewarded for the hard work we put in. In the Commonwealth Games, our products fetched Indian athletes medals and we were very happy when we saw that on television. When we came to know that our products will be used in London, we felt great, rather proud,” says Rajendra.The odd visits by Poonia and other Indian athletes notwithstanding, they are busy shaping the equipment from 8 am to 5 pm.It fetches them around Rs 5,000 to Rs 8,000 monthly, depending upon the work they do.advertisement”We have been working in this industry for a long time. It takes a lot of time for a new person to come and learn the techniques of production,” says Rajendra.Not all are happy with their wages, though. “There is little that we could save at the end of month,” says one of them.Surinder Pal Singh, production manager at the Anand Track and Field, has seen the industry change in his 27-year career.”There was a time when these equipment were all made by hand. Now machines are used at all stages of production and the finished product is totally different.””Though there has been a steady increase in demand over the years, but athletics is still not popular in India. The success of our athletes in the Commonwealth Games did generate some interest,” he added.last_img read more

10 months agoBurnley defender Charlie Taylor: Late Tottenham goal hard to take

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Burnley defender Charlie Taylor: Late Tottenham goal hard to takeby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley defender Charlie Taylor admits defeat at Tottenham was hard to take.Christian Eriksen fired Spurs’ injury-time winner on Saturday.”We worked on it in training this week and it went perfectly well,” said Taylor, who lined up to the left of a three-man central defence.“We were set for what would have been a great point at a very tough away fixture.“It’s absolutely gutting. In terms of losing a game, it’s the worst way you can possibly do it.“After holding on for so long and then to concede in injury time is horrible.“But we are looking more like a typical Burnley team over recent weeks.“We got a good result and a clean sheet last week and again we got so close against a top side, so there were definitely positives from our point of view.” last_img read more

Cian Dabrowski looking for seniors to leave legacy for Ohio State womens

OSU then-freshman attacker Cian Dabrowski (14) during a game against Maryland on May 1. Credit: Courtesy of Ben SolomanSenior attackman Cian Dabrowski said she believes the leadership and influence of the senior class will lead the Ohio State women’s lacrosse team to reach new heights this season on the heels of a 13-8 campaign.Dabrowski enters her senior season coming off a 2015 season for the books. She is the team’s active leader with 69 goals and 25 assists and she scored a team-high four goals when OSU knocked off No. 1 Maryland in the semifinals of the 2015 Big Ten tournament. This broke the Terrapins’ 27-game winning streak and gave the Buckeyes their first win over a top-ranked team in program history.“That was my favorite moment of my career as a Buckeye,” Dabrowski said. “No one really expected us to beat them, so it made that victory so much sweeter, and we all take a lot of pride in that game.”Going into the 2016 season, Dabrowski said she wants to continue the success the team has had in the past as different people step up and fill new roles.“Our team’s goals this year revolve around trying to build off of a great season last year and continuing to grow,” Dabrowski said. “We proved to be a big threat in our conference, as well as in the country, so continuing with that elite mentality is something we work on everyday.”Dabrowski said her personal role on the squad has evolved drastically since her freshman year.“We had some phenomenal players my first few years, so it was my job to learn from them and find a way to complement them,” Dabrowski said. “Now it’s my opportunity to put everything I’ve learned to work, and I’m looking forward to having more trust and assurance from my teammates when I have the ball.”OSU then-freshman attacker Cian Dabrowski (14) celebrates with teammates after a goal during a game against Maryland on May 1. Credit: Courtesy of Ben SolomanCoach Alexis Venechanos, in her sixth year at the helm for the Buckeyes, said Dabrowski and the rest of the senior class have always had great leaders above them, and she expects them to carry that quality on to their younger teammates.“I think Cian is really taking on the leadership role well,” Venechanos said. “She’s taking some of these newcomers under her wing in the attacking end, and she’s working well with our returners and some players who need a little more game experience.”Dabrowski said having nine teammates in her class brings a sense of variable leadership, which is reflected throughout the entire team.“Looking at nine of us for leadership is a blessing for our team, because it allows for so much diversity, and that unifies us with the younger girls,” Dabrowski said. “Our senior class is the most determined, hardworking and passionate group of girls that I am fortunate enough to call my teammates.”Venechanos said she is excited to see how Dabrowski will influence her team this season.“In the big stage, Cian is clutch,” Venechanos said. “She will be a person we will look up to both on and off the field this year.”Growing up in a lacrosse and hockey family, Dabrowski said she has a different perception of the game, which is something that she said she can use to her advantage as a leader.“I hope to continue to use this to my advantage in the upcoming season by inspiring my teammates to approach things differently,” Dabrowski said. “This is something that the Buckeye lacrosse atmosphere motivates me to do, while continuing with our own traditions, it can be truly humbling.”Venechanos said Dabrowski is a phenomenal player and an even better person, making her the ideal leader for the team. The hype around the Canadian product led to her being one of three OSU players named to the Big Ten’s players to watch list on Monday.“She has this great sense of self-confidence and never gets flustered when she makes a mistake,” Venechanos said. “She has this poise around her, and I’m really impressed with her competitiveness and determination.” Dabrowski and the Buckeyes are set to kick off their 2016 season on Feb. 13 against Detroit at 3:30 p.m. at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. read more

Commentary Amid football turmoil the other sports show true meaning of Scarlet

In an era of Ohio State athletics history defined by discounted tattoos, dishonesty and disgrace, it’s hard not to feel let down or jaded as football scandals are unearthed, one by one. But it’s times like these when the character of the majority should outshine that of a few. In my time with The Lantern, I’ve covered a variety of sporting events and talked to countless athletes and coaches. But if I’ve learned anything, it’s that the athletes worthy of recognition aren’t just the ones wearing helmets and shoulder pads. Sure, Terrelle Pryor hitting DeVier Posey over the middle for a touchdown is impressive. But it pales in comparison to synchronized swimmer Meghan Kinney fighting for her life against bone cancer as she’s forced to watch her team win a national championship without her. Watching Solomon Thomas’ Sugar Bowl-clinching interception was incredible, but it’s no more impressive than watching the men’s volleyball team defeat California-Santa Barbara for its first national championship in program history. Watching women’s lacrosse player Kirsten Donahue check opponents to the turf can be just as brutal as watching Mike Adams pancake defensive linemen. I could discuss men’s track and field All-American Michael Hartfield’s pursuit of competing at the Olympic trials in the name of his father who passed away shortly after Hartfield arrived at OSU. Or senior women’s tennis captain Paloma Escobedo fighting back from a late-season injury to compete in the sport she loves. I sat glued to my seat while softball’s Karisa Medrano pitched a complete game to clinch a 4-3 victory with runners on base against Pittsburgh. The point is, all of these athletes play with grit and determination. They win with pride and courage, and they lose with emotion and dignity. Just because they don’t enter Ohio Stadium every Saturday and play while millions watch live on television, doesn’t mean we should ignore, or worse, forget who these athletes are. They compete at every opportunity for a fraction of the recognition, and they do it with integrity and love for their sport. These are the people who represent what Buckeye athletics really are. read more