Copper collector hid behind couch

first_imgFacebook Advertisement Previous articleHolidaymakers beware of jewellery scamsNext articleLimerick to have own designated ‘graffiti’ street admin Linkedin Email Printcenter_img A MAN who said that he had been given permission to remove copper piping from a house due for demolition, hid behind a couch when gardai came on the scene, a court heard.Jonathan Curtin(21) of 13 Yeats Avenue, admitted he was removing copper piping form a house at Mountain View in O’Malley Park on January 30 last.The court heard from Inspector Paul Reidy that gardai arrived at the house to find a “large bolt cutters at the front door. Mr Curtin was hiding behind a couch”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Limerick District Court heard that Mr Curtin had 108 previous convictions, all for road traffic offences.Mr Curtin’s solicitor, John Devane, said that his client had been “working on an ad-hoc basis for the firm responsible for demolishing these houses under the Regeneration project. He had asked the builders if he could take the copper and was told he could”.Mr Devane said that Mr Curtin “was constantly getting into trouble. as a young person. with driving offences.“He has been out of trouble for some time now”.Judge Eugene O’Kelly asked why Mr Curtin was hiding behind the couch if he believed he had permission to take the copper?“Panic” Mr Devane said.Judge O’Kelly remanded him on bail for a probation report to November 8. WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsCopper collector hid behind couchBy admin – July 10, 2012 961 Twitterlast_img read more

Washington Post journalist reflects on career

first_imgWil Haygood, biographer and journalist for The Washington Post, spoke in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium on Tuesday evening about his work in journalism and about his books, including the award-winning “The Butler: A Witness to History,” which was released concurrently with the critically-acclaimed film of the same name.Rosie Biehl | The Observer Haygood, who is visiting campus as a journalist-in-residence of the John W. Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics and Democracy, said he was shocked to find that no one had told the story of Eugene Allen, a White House butler who served eight presidents, before he did. Haygood said he knew he had to retell the life story of such an interesting man.“I asked Allen if anyone had ever written a story about him. He looked me and said, ‘If you think I’m worthy I believe you’d be the first.’ It hurt me deeply that he didn’t consider his own life worthy of retelling,” Haygood said. “I had no idea how much the story would resonate with readers, but I knew I had a story that would excite me. I knew it was a story that I wanted to write.”Haygood described his intense desire to write as a reporter and the obstacles he faced just getting his foot in the door.“I didn’t have enough experience when I started out to be a full-time reporter so I decided to take a test to be a copy editor and I was hired,” Haygood said. “I was at that position for a year and a half, but I fiercely wanted to write.“So on my days off I used to go around town and talk to people and find stories. So after that time I had over 100 unpaid stories published in order to have some clips to send to other editors.”Haygood said he saw his writing career as a natural progression from his career has a journalist and that the two work together to help him in both pursuits.“A lot of the authors that I had admired had their roots in newspapers,” he said. “I was used to writing 3,000 word articles, and about 45 of those would be about the length of a book. I knew that if I wanted to write books that I would have the skills and the training.“I wanted to have my journalism lead to something else, and books just started calling me and grabbing my interest.”Haygood said for him, writing has always been about telling good stories and getting them to people in a medium that is unlike any other.“I think I’ve always wanted to write, to bring a picture to the page without a picture,” he said. “The best novels can make you see and visualize a whole world without any pictures. That’s what I want to do with my writing.”Tags: Gallivan Program, Journalism Ethics & Democracy, The Butler, The Washington Post, Wil Haygoodlast_img read more